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TTS Coupé
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  Audi TTS Coupé

  Article Image gallery (9) Specifications  
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Country of origin:Germany
Introduced in:2014
Introduced at:2014 Geneva Motor Show
Predecessor:Audi TTS Coupe
Source:Company press release
Last updated:March 03, 2014
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Click here to download printer friendly versionA completely revised edition of a modern classic is ready to take center stage: The Audi TT and Audi TTS will celebrate their world premieres at the Geneva Motor Show. The third generation of the compact sports car is again captivating, with its emotional design and dynamic qualities. The new Coupé is characterized by the use of innovative technologies in its engine and in its control and display concept, including the Audi virtual cockpit.

"The Audi TT is the epitome of an authentic design icon and a top-performance driving machine," explains Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, Member of the Board of Management of AUDI AG for Technical Development. "With the new generation, we are making this technology even easier for the driver to experience - just as they would expect from a real sports car."

When the first-generation Audi TT came on the market in 1998 it was a design revolution - its strictly geometrical, formally coherent design language made it an icon with huge charisma. For the third TT generation, the Audi designers have returned to many of these ideas and placed them in a new context that is as dynamic as it is diverse.

The front of the new TT is dominated by horizontal lines. The Singleframe grille is much broader and flatter than that of the previous model, with a powerful line dividing it into two zones. Starting in the top corners of the grille, sharp contours run in a V across the hood, which bears the four Audi rings - as on the Audi R8 high-performance sports car (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 14.9 - 12.4 (15.79 - 18.97 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 349 - 289 (561.66 - 465.10 g/mile). The air intakes feature struts that direct part of the flow away from the front to the flanks.

The flat headlights give the new TT's face a determined look. Xenon plus units are standard, and Audi can optionally provide LED headlights or ones in pioneering Audi Matrix LED technology, where the high beam is generated by controllable individual LEDs. On both versions, there is an unmistakable contour created by the separating strip in the headlights, which is illuminated by light guides.

The Matrix LED headlights consist of 12 LEDs and include another Audi innovation: dynamic turn signals that light up sequentially in the direction in which the driver is steering. The predictive cornering light uses navigation data to move the cone of light into the curve before the steering wheel is turned.

From the side, the new Audi TT is equally lean and muscular; it rests low on the road as if ready to pounce. At 4.18 meters (13.71 ft), the Coupé is almost exactly the same length as its predecessor, though its wheelbase has grown by 37 mm (1.46 in) to 2,505 mm (8.22 ft), making for especially short overhangs. It is 1,832 mm (6.01 ft) wide, and has the same height as the previous model at 1,353 mm (4.44 ft).

A lot of the details of the new Audi TT's profile are reminiscent of the first-generation of the modern classic. The contour of the sill creates a striking refracting edge, while the broad wheel arches form their own geometric bodies. The front wheel arch breaches the line of the hood, which continues over the door as a tornado line and runs almost horizontally through to the tail as a strong body shoulder.

The flat greenhouse gives the impression of being an independent unit and the slight kink in the rear side window gives it additional tension. The fuel flap on the right side panel is the classic circle and surrounded by socket screws; a light tap on the TT logo and the flap opens. This shape is again reminiscent of the first-generation TT. What is new is that there is no tank lid beneath the flap. This means that there is nothing to be unscrewed and the pump nozzle slots straight into the tank neck, just like in motor racing.

Specifically at the tail, horizontal lines underline the impression of the new TT's sporty width. Together with the LED and Audi Matrix LED headlights, the tail lights also have dynamic turn signals. Another parallel to the front headlights: the strip in the tail lights, which also form a daytime running light contour - another Audi innovation. The third brake light is an extremely narrow strip positioned under the edge of the rear spoiler. It plays an essential part in defining the tail light silhouette.

At a speed of 120 km/h (74.56 mph) a spoiler extends from the trunk lid to improve both air resistance and downforce. All models have two large round exhaust tailpipes. These are again reminiscent of the original TT. Like all Audi S models, the TTS exhales through four oval tailpipes.

The optional S line exterior package makes the design of the bumpers, air intakes, Singleframe grille, sills and the rear diffuser even sharper and sportier. And handling is even more dynamic, with 18" wheels and a body that rests 10 mm (0.39 in) lower.

Lightweight construction is one of Audi's greatest areas of expertise. The second-generation Audi TT already featured an Audi Space Frame (ASF) body made from aluminum and steel. For the new TT, Audi has systematically taken this composite construction principle even further, in line with the idea: the right amount of the right material in the right place for optimal functions.

The Coupé's underbody structure has optimized axle loads and is made of modern, high-strength and ultra-high-strength steel alloys. In the sections of the passenger cell that are subject to the most structural stress, form-hardened steel panels, which are both ultra-high-strength and light are used - these constitute 17 percent of the body's weight. The side sills and roof frame are made of extruded aluminum profiles that are integrated into the structure using cast aluminum nodes. This structural principle creates a very rigid and safe bodyshell. The aluminum side sections and roof complete the structure. The hood, doors and trunk lid are also made of this light metal.

All in all, the Audi engineers have, for the second time in a row, succeeded in significantly reducing the unladen weight of the Audi TT. At the first model change in 2006, up to 90 kg (198.42 lb) were saved, and the 2.0 TFSI engine variant of the new TT weighs just 1,230 kg (2,711.69 lb). This makes it around 50 kg (110.23 lb) lighter than its predecessor.

The low overall weight is further proof of Audi's expertise in lightweight construction. It impacts positively especially on acceleration, handling and fuel consumption.

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  Article Image gallery (9) Specifications