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Old 11-21-2014, 12:54 PM
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Chrysler TC by Maserati 1988-1990

Chrysler's TC by Maserati was a "Q" body based on a modified second generation Chrysler K platform jointly developed by Chrysler and Maserati as a grand tourer and introduced at the 1986 Los Angeles Auto Show. After 2 years of development delays, the TC became available in late-1989 and 7,300 units were manufactured in Milan, Italy by the time production ended in 1990. All cars sold as 1991 models were actually manufactured in 1990.

Lee Iacocca started a friendship with the late Alejandro de Tomaso while at Ford, which led to the De Tomaso Pantera. During the 1980s, Iacocca headed Chrysler while De Tomaso was owner of the historic Maserati brand. In 1984, both companies signed a memorandum of understanding to create a sport coupe, which ultimately became the TC. Chrysler also became an investor in Maserati during that period. In 1985, Lee Iacocca stated that the planned "Q-coupé" would be the prettiest Italian to arrive stateside since his mother immigrated.

The 1989 TC used a slightly detuned 160 bhp (119 kW; 162 PS) Daytona-spec turbocharged 2.2 L straight-4. This intercooled version, known as the Turbo II, was coupled to an A413 three-speed automatic transaxle. The Turbo II was replaced by a Mitsubishi-sourced 3.02 L 141 bhp (105 kW; 143 PS) V6 engine for the 1990 and 1991 model years, with the automatic transaxle being upgraded to a four-speed A604 unit.

501 cars were built with an optional drivetrain consisting of a Getrag manual transmission and a 16-valve head version of the 2.2 L. This engine is often called the "Maserati" engine because it was built by Maserati and has a Maserati-branded cast valve cover.

The 200 hp (149 kW; 203 PS) 16-valve 2.2 L "Maserati" engine's cylinder head was cast in England by Cosworth and finished in Italy by Maserati. The pistons came from Mahle GmbH in Germany. The camshafts were designed by Florida-based Crane Cams and were manufactured by Maserati in Modena. The "Maserati" engine used a specially-made 2.2 block, upgraded crankshaft and rods. A Japanese turbocharger was sourced from IHI. The rest of the engine used common Turbo II parts made in the United States.

The TC's platform was based on a shortened Dodge Daytona chassis with suspension and axles from the original model (except for the 5 speed Getrag with "Maserati" engine). The bodywork was produced by De Tomaso subsidiary Innocenti. The struts and shock absorbers were specially designed for the car by Fichtel and Sachs, and a Teves anti-lock braking system was standard. The special wheels were made in Italy by the Formula One supplier Fondmetal.

The TC featured a detachable hard top with opera windows and a manually operated cloth lined convertible top that was available in either tan or black. For the 1989 model year, interior leather colors were ginger or bordeaux. Available exterior colors were yellow, red, or cabernet. The bordeaux interior was only available with the cabernet exterior, both of which were dropped in 1990 when black and white exterior colors were added along with a black leather interior.

The most rare TC built was a "special" at the end of the production run for a Chrysler executive. It was white with a bordeaux interior and the Maserati engine, the only 1991 car to have that color interior or engine.

The TC's dash, door panels, seats, armrest, and rear fascia panels were covered in hand-stitched Italian leather. Inside doorjambs were finished with stainless steel panels and sill plates. The convertible boot, over which the hardtop rests, is a body colored metal panel. A special interior storage compartment came with an umbrella, tool kit, and small spare tire that allowed the use of the full-sized trunk even with the top down. Standard equipment included a 10-speaker Infinity AM/FM cassette stereo, power windows, 6-way power seats, power door and trunk locks, map lights, puddle lamps, cruise control, and tilt steering wheel.

The only extra cost option available for the TC was a CD player that was a plug-in attachment to the standard Infinity AM/FM cassette stereo.

Source: wikipedia.org
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