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Thread: Famous Touring Cars

  1. #1
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    Famous Touring Cars

    Recent discussions in the thread "My first post and my car" (http://www.ultimatecarpage.com/forum...4&page=1&pp=15) about the Ford Sierra RS500 Cosworth have got me thinking that it is time that I started a thread based on an idea I have been toying with for some time. My favourite form of motorsport is Touring Car Racing, which I've been following closely across various championships and classes since the mid 1980s. I've amassed a huge collection of literature and knowledge on touring cars. During this time I've often wished that someone had written a book or prepared a website covering all the top touring car catagories, the championships, the cars, the races and the top drivers. Its easy enough to find data on individual cars, championships, races, etc, but never in the same place.
    I'm not going to attempt to cover everything on touring cars in this thread - that would require a massive book. But I am going to cover some of the more famous cars that have competed in various touring car catagories.
    I'll touch over the specs, history, race victories and attach a couple of pictures.
    I propose to cover the period from the 1960s to today and cover such catagories as Group A, Group 2, Super Touring, DTM and V8 Supercars.
    Some of the cars that I'm thinking of covering are: from Group A - the Ford Sierra RS500 Cosworth, BMW M3 E30, BMW 635CSI, Jaguar XJS, Holden Commodore VK-VN, Nissan Skyline GTR R32, Volvo 240T, Toyota Corolla AE86; from DTM - Mercedes 190E 2.5, Alfa 155, Opel Calibra and Astra, Mercedes CLK, Audi TT, Audi A4; from Group 2 - Ford Capri RS3100, BMW 3.0 CSL, Ford Escort RS; from the 1960s BTCC rules - Mini Cooper, Ford Cortina Lotus, from V8 Supercar - the various Holden Commodore and Ford Falcon models; from Super Touring - Audi A4 Quattro, Renault Laguna, BMW 320i, Ford Mondeo, Volvo S40, Nissan Primera.
    As you can see from the above list, that's a lot of cars. So this will be an occasional thread, updated when I have time.
    If there's a car you think should be included, tell me, or post about it yourself.
    Last edited by motorsportnerd; 02-17-2005 at 07:09 PM.
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  2. #2
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    Very good idea,

    some popular ones from the sixties, which you may want to consider
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

  3. #3
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    some more, Nurburgring 2004
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

  4. #4
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    My knowledge of 1960s touring car racing in Europe and UK is a little scratchy. But I am aware of the Jaguar Mark 2s, Lotus Cortinas, various Alfas, that Ford Falcon Sprint you posted a picture of, etc.
    I'll do my best to add them.
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  5. #5
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    Ooh... I'll take the Lotus Cortina please. No need to wrap it -- I'll drive it home.

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    Great Train Robber Ronnie Biggs used to thrape about the country side near where I live in his Lotus Cortina whilst scouting out various escape routes/ hiding places etc.
    Thanks for all the fish

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coventrysucks
    Great Train Robber Ronnie Biggs used to thrape about the country side near where I live in his Lotus Cortina whilst scouting out various escape routes/ hiding places etc.
    and the used a Mk-2 for the momento supremo
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

  8. #8
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    Here are some from the eighties
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  9. #9
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    Monday's update will include an iconic touring car of the 1970s.
    If you should see a man walking down a crowded street talking aloud to himself, don't run in the opposite direction, but run towards him, because he's a poet. You have nothing to fear from the poet - but the truth.

    (Ted Joans)

  10. #10
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    Group A

    I’ll start with the Group A cars. Group A was introduced as the main touring car category in Europe in 1982 to replace the older Group 1 rules. Under the rules, a manufacturer could race any 4-seater car of which a least 5,000 units had been built. A number of freedoms were allowed to modify the engine, exhaust and suspension. A car could be lowered, provided the wheels still fitted within the wheel arches. The body had to remain identical to the production car.
    After building the basic 5,000 cars to allow for homologation, a manufacturer could build a further 500 “evolution” cars. This allowed the manufacturer to build cars with specific items that would make them more competitive on the race track, such as special suspension or engine components or spoilers and wings. The reasoning behind this was that it was cheaper to build 500 hotrods rather than have to put the special items on the 5,000+ basic cars.
    Three class categories were introduced: Class 1 for over 2,500 cc cars, Class 2 for 1,601 to 2,500 cc cars and Class 3 for under 1600 cc cars. Turbo-charged and rotary power cars were required to add 1.4 to get their actual race capacity (ie a 2,000 cc turbo car was given a nominal 2,800 cc for racing). This penalty was increased to 1.7 after 1988.
    The weight of the car depended on the engine size, and weights limits were changed several times during the life of the category. As a guide, minimum weights were as follows:
    Over 5,000 cc cars - 1,400 kg.
    4,501 cc to 4,999 cc - 1,325 kg (1,340 kg in 1988, 1,250 kg in Australia in 1990-92)
    4,001 cc to 4,500 cc – 1,255 kg
    3,501 to 4,000 cc - 1,125 kg
    3,001 to 3,500 cc – 1,110 kg (1,100 kg after 1988, 1,150 kg in Australia in 1992)
    2,501 to 3,000 cc – 1,035 kg (1,020 kg after 1988)
    2,001 to 2,500 cc - 960kg (920kg after 1988)
    1,601 to 2,000 cars - 880 kg
    1,301 to 1,600 cc cars - 800 kgs.
    The idea was that the cars of various classes and engine sizes would end up with similar power to weight ratios.
    During the 1980s, Group A racing was adopted as the primary touring car category in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan.
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  11. #11
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    The Ford Sierra Story

    1985-86 Ford Sierra XR4Ti
    In 1984, Ford was searching around for a competitive car to homologate into Group A for use in the European Touring Car Championship (ETCC). At the time Ford had several “performance” coupes available for sale in Europe or the USA which were able to be homologated into Group A. The Ford Capri 2.8i was long in the tooth and no longer competitive. The Ford Sierra XR4i had more up to date aerodynamics and suspension, but the same engine as the Capri, which effectively ruled it out as a competitive proposition. Then there was the Mustang – either the V8 GT or the 2.3-litre Turbo SVO version. The problem with the Mustang wasn’t lack of competitiveness, but rather that it wasn't marketed in Europe, therefore Ford Europe wasn’t interested in homologating and developing it. German tuner Zakspeed did prepare and use Mustangs in the 1984 DTM, and Australian driver Dick Johnson choose the Mustang GT V8 when Australia adopted Group A regulations. Both had limited success, but since Ford USA wasn’t interested, the V8 Mustang was never developed to its full potential and the turbo Mustang SVO wasn’t even homologated.
    Finally, there was a fourth, more suitable car. Ford USA imported the Sierras into the US at this stage, but instead of being fitted with the 2.8 litre V6 injected engine like in the UK, the US Sierras received the Mustang SVO’s 2.3 litre turbocharged engine. In the US the car was sold as the Mercury Merkur XR4Ti. Here lay the interim solution as to which car Ford could race in Group A in Europe until something better could be developed. The car was homologated, had the Sierra badges put back on it and became the Sierra XR4Ti.
    Top UK touring car driver Andy Rouse was the first person to campaign the Sierra XR4Ti, and won the BTCC in 1985 in it. As 1985 went on, the XR4Tis started to appear in the DTM and toward the end of the year in the ETCC.
    For 1986, Ford became serious about developing the car. By then it was known that the Sierra Cosworth was under development, and the XR4Ti made an ideal base to develop suspension components. Top Swiss tuner, Eggenburger Racing was recruited to develop and race two Sierra XR4Tis in the 1986 ETCC. Eggenburger had just won the 1985 ETCC with a Volvo 240 Turbo, so they knew their stuff. Top drivers of the time, Steve Soper (recently voted best ever touring car driver by the UK Motorsport magazine), Klaus Niedzwiedz and Pierre Dieudonne were recruited to the driving lineup for the factory Eggenburger Sierra XR4Tis,
    The car was progressively developed during the 1986 season, eventually winning the final round of the 1986 ETCC, the Estoril 500 in Portugal.
    At the end of 1986, after two seasons of development, the XR4Ti made way for the newer, lighter Sierra Cosworth.

    Major championship and race victories 1985-86
    1985 British Touring Car Championship – Andy Rouse
    1986 ETCC Round 14, Estoril 500, Portugal – Steve Soper/Klaus Niedzwiedz.

    Specs:
    Engine:
    2,300 cc 4-clyinder, 8 valve, SOHC, turbocharged.
    Power: 248kW (330bhp)

    Transmission: 5-speed

    Driving Wheels: Rear.

    Homologated Kerb Weight: 1,110 kg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by motorsportnerd; 02-18-2005 at 07:41 AM.
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  12. #12
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    1987 Ford Sierra RS Cosworth

    While Ford Europe made a decision to race the Sierra XR4Ti during 1985 and 1986, it knew that long term it needed to develop a smaller engine that could better fit into the Group A weight rules. The XR4Ti ran in the 3,000 – 3,500 cc weight class due the turbo equivalency rules. With a smaller 2.0 litre engine, the Sierra could run under the 2,500-3,000 cc rules. In theory a 2.0 litre turbo could put out the same power as the 2.3 turbo, at less weight.
    Ford contracted Cosworth engineering to develop a turbocharged 2.0 litre engine. The result was a 2.0 litre DOHC 16-valve engine producing 150 kW (200bhp) in road trim. Ford release the road going Sierra RS Cosworth in 1985.
    As well as the specialised. 2.0 litre turbo engine, the RS Cosworth also received an enormous rear wing mounted near the top of the hatch. This was designed to help give the car better downforce on the track.
    Ford built 5,000 RS Cosworths and had them homologated and ready to race by the start of the 1987 season. The RS Cosworth was only intended to be an interim car. It ran a smaller turbo than was desirable for race use, in the interests of reliability in the road car. Ford planned a “evolution” version of the RS Cosworth, which would require a further 500 cars be built. This would be the RS500 Cosworth.
    Until sufficient numbers of the production RS500 were built, race teams had to make do with the RS.
    The Eggenburger team once again was the factory backed Ford team, and two Eggenburger Sierra RS Cosworths lined up in the 1987 World Touring Car Championship. The RS Cosworths had 360 bhp, about 30 more than the XR4Tis of the previous season, and weighed 75 kg less. They proved fast, but fragile, only picking up one major win at the Nurburgring during their 6 month race career.
    In Australia, Dick Johnson switched from the Mustang to the Sierra. Johnson’s team was used to V8 OHV technology and took a while to adapt to the English turbocharged Sierra. However, the Johnson Sierra’s showed potential, with Johnson winning the Adelaide round of the 1987 WTCC.

    First Race: 1987 ATCC Round 1 at Calder – Dick Johnson
    Last Race: 1987 WTCC Spa 24 hour Belgium
    The RS Cosworth only had a 6 month long race career before being replaced by the RS500.

    Major Championship and Race Victories:
    1987 WTCC Nurburgring 500 Germany – Klaus Ludwig/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1987 ATCC Adelaide round – Dick Johnson

    Specs:
    Engine:
    1,994 cc 4-clyinder, 16 valve, DOHC, Garrett T03 turbocharger, 1.6 bar of boost.
    Power: 270kW (360 bhp)

    Transmission: Getrag 5-speed.


    Driving Wheels: Rear.

    Homologated Kerb Weight: 1,035 kg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by motorsportnerd; 02-18-2005 at 08:09 AM.
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  13. #13
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    1987-92 Ford Sierra RS500 Cosworth.

    The Sierra RS500 Cosworth was the “evolution” version of the original RS Cosworth. The car featured a larger Garret T03B turbocharger, that was capable of handling much more turbo boost than the RS. In the car’s early competition days, power outputs on the race cars jumped from 360 bhp on the RS to around 450 bhp on the RS500. During the course of the RS500’s development over 5 and a half years, power ultimately peaked at around 620 bhp by the 1992 Bathurst 1000.
    The RS500 can be identified from the RS by the second lip spoiler on the hatch and an addition lip on the front air-dam.
    The RS500 made its racing debut at the Brno round of the 1987 World Touring Car Championship, were the Eggenburger finished first and second. The cars failed at their next appearance at Silverstone, but “won” the 1987 Bathurst 1000. The two Eggenburger cars were first and second across the line, but were later disqualified for irregularities with the wheel arches – which were found to be deeper than the standard car, allowing for greater wheel travel.
    The Eggenburger Sierras finished up the 1987 WTCC by winning the Calder round in Australia, the Wellington round in NZ and the Fuji round in Japan. These wins contributed to Ford winning the manufacturers title in the 1987 WTCC.
    By 1988, the Sierra were the cars to have in Group A racing. They dominated the 1988 ETCC, but failed to win the drivers championship due to the rules favouring class wins over outright wins. At the end of 1988, the FIA dropped the ETCC. The Sierras continued to be competitive in national championships, but the rules of the various championships started to move away from Group A regulations.
    So the story moves to Australia. Australia continued to retain Group A rules long after the ETCC died.
    The Dick Johnson Racing team was the first in Australia to develop the Sierra RS500s. At the start of 1988, a number of drivers were racing Sierras, but Johnson had a year’s head start on the others. As a result the DJR Shell Sierras finished first and second in the 1988 ATCC (Johnson 1st, team-mate John Bowe 2nd).
    Johnson even took one of his Sierras to Europe to see how it compared to the Eggenburger and Andy Rouse Sierras. The Johnson/Bowe Sierra made a one off appearance at the 1988 Silverstone TT500, where it took pole and led until minor reliability dramas put the car out.
    The Johnson team went to the 1988 Bathurst 1000 as favourites, but despite having a 3 car attack, suffered failures on two of the cars and only managed 2nd.
    However, another local Sierra RS500 won. The B&H Sierra RS00 of Tony Longhurst/Thomas Mezera won, from Johnson and the Caltex Sierra of Colin Bond/Alan Jones.
    In 1989, more teams switched to the Sierras for the ATCC. Long time Holden hero Peter Brock was amongst them, doing the almost unthinkable by switching to the Ford camp.
    The Johnson team still won the 1989 ATCC, but faced extra competition from Brock, Glen Seton and Tony Longhurst.
    The 1989 Bathurst 1000 was the final major Sierra victory (though a couple of other victories in Japan and NZ in lesser enduros followed). They finished 1st and 2nd, with the DJR Sierra of Dick Johnson/John Bowe beating home the Eggenburger/Moffat ANZ Sierra of Klaus Niedzwiedz/Frank Biela.
    In Europe, the Eggenburger team won the 1989 Spa 24-hour race as well.
    The Sierra continued to be developed and raced during the 1990 to 1992 seasons in Australia, but never quite had the same dominence they had in 1988-89.
    The 1990 ATCC almost fell to a Sierra. In a close championship, there were three Sierra drivers (Dick Johnson, Peter Brock and Colin Bond) who could have won the championship at the final round, but they were beaten by Jim Richards, who was driving a Nissan Skyline. Then, despite overwhelming favouritism, the Sierra failed to win the 1990 Bathurst 1000. Best of the Sierras in the 1990 Bathurst 1000 was the second DJR Sierra of Paul Radisich/Jeff Allam, which finished second.
    The Sierras did finally pick up a win in the BTCC in 1990 though, with Rob Gravett becoming the 1990 BTCC champion.
    There were slim pickings for Sierra drivers in 1991, as the Skyline GTR dominated the Australian scene. By 1991, the BTCC had banned turbo cars, so there were no Sierras racing in Europe.
    For 1992, there was a final glimmer of competitiveness. The Australian regulating body, CAMS, made some changes to the Group A regulations for the last season in Australia. The Sierras were allowed to use a 6-speed gearbox. Thanks partly to the 6-speed box and partly to the extra weight the Skylines had to carry, the Sierras managed to be much more competitive in 1992, with John Bowe claiming a couple of race victories.
    The 1992 Bathurst 1000 was the last appearance in the Bathurst classic for a Sierra, and Dick Johnson took pole, before he and John Bowe finished second.
    The final hurrah for the Sierra RS500s came in the 1992 Nissan Mobil series in New Zealand. Consistent performances in the two races saw Paul Radisich/Michael Preston win the Nissan Mobil series in the DJR Shell Sierra. A fitting end for the car’s career.


    First race: 1987 World Touring Car Championship round – Brno 500, Czechoslovakia.
    Last major race: 1992 Nissan Mobil 500 series, Pukekohe 500, New Zealand

    First major win: 1987 World Touring Car Championship round – Brno 500, Czechoslovakia.
    Last major win: 1989 Bathurst 1000 – Dick Johnson/John Bowe (note: two victories in the end of season Pukekohe 500 in NZ in 1989 and 90, plus victory in the 1989 Fuji 500 followed this, but these events did not have the stature or quality of entrants that Bathurst did).

    Major championship and race victories 1987 to 1992:
    Championships

    1987 World Touring Car Championship – helped win Manufacturers Title for Ford.
    1988 European Touring Car Championship – helped win Manufacturers Title for Ford.
    1988 Australian Touring Car Championship – Dick Johnson.
    1989 Australian Touring Car Championship – Dick Johnson
    1990 British Touring Car Championship – Robb Gravett
    1992 Nissan Mobil Series, New Zealand – Paul Radisich/Michael Preston.

    Major Race Wins (Endurance Races Only)
    1987 WTCC – Brno 500 – Klaus Niedzwiedz/Klaus Ludwig
    1987 WTCC – Calder 500, Australia – Steve Soper/Pierre Dieudonne
    1987 WTCC – Wellington 500, New Zealand – Steve Soper/Pierre Dieudonne
    1987 WTCC – Fuji 500, Japan – Klaus Niedzwiedz/Klaus Ludwig
    1988 ETCC - Monza 500, Italy – Steve Soper/Pierre Dieudonne
    1988 ETCC – Estoril 500, Portugal – Steve Soper/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1988 ETCC – Jarama 500, Spain – Steve Soper/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1988 ETCC – Dijon 500, France – Steve Soper/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1988 ETCC – Vallelunga 500, Italy – Pierre Dieudonne/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1988 ETCC – Nurburgring 500, Germany – Steve Soper/Klaus Ludwig
    1988 ETCC – Silverstone 500, UK – Andy Rouse/Alain Ferte
    1988 ETCC – Nogaro 500, France – Steve Soper/Klaus Ludwig
    1988 Bathurst 1000, Australia – Tony Longhust/Thomas Mezera
    1988 Inter-tec Fuji 500, Japan – Hisashi Yokoshima/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1988 Pukekohe 500, New Zealand – Andrew Miedeckie/Steve Soper
    1989 Spa 24 Hour, Belgium – Gianfranco Brancatelli/Bernd Scheidner/Win Percy
    1989 Bathurst 1000, Australia – Dick Johnson/John Bowe
    1989 Pukekohe 500, New Zealand – Dick Johnson/John Bowe
    1989 Intertec Fuji 500, Japan – Allan Moffat/Klaus Niedzwiedz
    1990 Pukekohe 500, New Zealand – Peter Brock/Graeme Crosby


    Drivers most associated with the RS500 – undoubtedly Dick Johnson, who raced the cars for six seasons. Also, Klaus Niedzwiedz and Steve Soper.

    Specs:
    Engine:
    1,994 cc 4-clyinder, 16 valve, DOHC, Garrett T03 turbocharger, up to 2.3 bar of boost pressure.
    Power: at start of development in 1987 - 338kW (450 bhp)@7000 rpm. At finish of development in 1992 – 466kW (620 bhp)@7,000 rpm. This represents an increase during the six year development life of 128kW.
    Torque: about 630Nm@6,000 rpm.

    Transmission: from 1987 to 1991: Getrag 5-speed.
    1992: Getrag 6-speed.

    Driving Wheels: Rear.

    Homologated Kerb Weight: 1987 – 1,035 kg
    1988 to 1990 – 1,100 kg (increased due to changes governing turbo multiplication factor)
    1991 to 1992 – 1,150 kg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by motorsportnerd; 02-21-2005 at 06:04 AM.
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  14. #14
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    More Sierra RS500 photos.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    UCP's biggest Ford Sierra RS500 and BMW M3 E30 fan. My two favourite cars of all time.

  15. #15
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    excellent stuff, thanks, looking forward to whatever is to follow
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

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