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Thread: Finished - 1928 Mercedes SS Sonder Kabriolet

  1. #1
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    Finished - 1928 Mercedes SS Sonder Kabriolet

    This one's for you Esperante.

    I built this one totally OOB. No scratch-building and very little detailing.
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  2. #2
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    Pocher this one? The wire wheels look perfect.
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

  3. #3
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    Not a Pocher Henk. This one was a Minicraft. The wheels were "spoked" using a strand of 28 gauge wire. The wheels are really the highlight of the kit. It's 1:16 scale and a great kit.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyM
    Not a Pocher Henk. This one was a Minicraft. The wheels were "spoked" using a strand of 28 gauge wire. The wheels are really the highlight of the kit. It's 1:16 scale and a great kit.
    meaning that you scratchbuilt the wheels or did you have to fully construct from material supplied in the kit? Like in the metal Revival 1/20 kits?
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

  5. #5
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    Everything needed for the wheels is supplied with the kit including the jig you use to secure the multi-part rims. Someday i'll build another one of these and detail it to the nines. In the meantime, I highly recommend building this one. They're on eBay every now and again and they can be had for a reasonable price.

  6. #6
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    It may not be as detailed as your other ones, but still awesome nonetheless. How many hours did this one take? Also would you reccomend a kit like this for beginners? If so, how did this one cost? Looking at your kits is starting to inspire me to build one of my own. Awesome work...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sauc3
    Looking at your kits is starting to inspire me to build one of my own. Awesome work...
    Looking at yoru kits is makign me feel inadequate.
    Anyone want to buy a kit-stash ??

    Nah, not really, I just have to try harder
    "A woman without curves is like a road without bends, you might get to your destination quicker but the ride is boring as hell'

  8. #8
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    Sauc - I think I put about 100 hours into this one. Most of the time was spent on the paint job. I built this a few years back when I was just getting back into model building after a 10-year hiatus. A more skilled builder could get it done in less time. I would recommend this kit for anyone who's built one or two pieces and wants to move up to a large scale. The engine is not overly complex and the only major mods necessary are to the bonnet where the exhaust flex pipes exit. Other than that, the kit is well made and instructions are clear. Lacing the wheels is straight forward and the results are quite handsome (I think). I wouldn't make this the first kit you ever build, but I'd definitely put it on your "should build" list if you love classics. In terms of difficulty, it's more challenging than a level 2 1:24 piece, but not nearly as testing as a Pocher.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matra et Alpine
    Looking at yoru kits is makign me feel inadequate.
    Anyone want to buy a kit-stash ??

    Nah, not really, I just have to try harder
    I might be interested.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyM
    Sauc - I think I put about 100 hours into this one. Most of the time was spent on the paint job. I built this a few years back when I was just getting back into model building after a 10-year hiatus. A more skilled builder could get it done in less time. I would recommend this kit for anyone who's built one or two pieces and wants to move up to a large scale. The engine is not overly complex and the only major mods necessary are to the bonnet where the exhaust flex pipes exit. Other than that, the kit is well made and instructions are clear. Lacing the wheels is straight forward and the results are quite handsome (I think). I wouldn't make this the first kit you ever build, but I'd definitely put it on your "should build" list if you love classics. In terms of difficulty, it's more challenging than a level 2 1:24 piece, but not nearly as testing as a Pocher.
    Thanks Andy. I have a Ferrari beginner's kit lying around somewhere, I probably should get around to finishing that before I start on a new one . If not this one, what would you suggest for starter kits?

  10. #10
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    When I'm working with new model builders, I usually start them in two phases. First is the construction phase. For that, I like to get them into Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Corvettes, anything that has fair amount of engine detail. The key here is to build the construction skills. Once those are coming along, I like to focus on cars that don't have particularly complex body designs. This is where I like to introduce them to basic rattle can and air brush skills. I try and avoid car bodies with lots of compound curves and that require a bunch of masking. The key here for me is to help them get comfortable laying down a nice clean stroke.

    That being said, if you are looking for 1:24 scale, I recommend the Duesenbergs or Packards. The Rolls-Royce pieces are nice, but if it's a beginner's project, the bodies could give you fits when it's time to paint.

    If you want to start with a slightly larger scale, I'd recommend the Minicraft 1:16 Cadillac v16 or Packard Town Car. Both offer a nice amount of detail opportunity without being overwhelming and both provide body designs that a novice painter can do very well with.

    Keep in mind though, that there's no "right" answer to your question. The best kits to start with are the kits of the cars that you love. The bottom line is, if you don't love the car, building a model of it is likely to be far less than a rewarding and enjoyable experience.

  11. #11
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    Wow-the black looks fantastic! I have mine done up in the off-white/black combo as shown on the box, but this has me rethinking. Thanks.
    TOYNBEE IDEA IN KUBRICK 2001 RESURRECT DEAD ON PLANET JUPITER

  12. #12
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    Esperante - either one is correct. Mercedes-Benz made two of these cars. The 1927 version was white w/o running boards and the 1928 version was black with full boards and the maroon interior.

  13. #13
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    Jul 2008
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    Nice work, looking to build one of these in my stash. Wish there was a detail set, including decals!

  14. #14
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    Mar 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyM View Post
    This one's for you Esperante.

    I built this one totally OOB. No scratch-building and very little detailing.

    I came across this old thread not too long ago, and am working on the same kit. One of the biggest issues I see is that the molding along the bottom of the top hood surface doesn't match up well with the molding at the cowl, but yours looks good. How did you fix it?

    PS: There were other color schemes available, such as chocolate brown with cream as shown in their catalog, and a 1933 version that was pimped out even more in dark gray and black, with metal pinstriping along the molding. You can see it at
    Schlegelmilch Photography under Automobile Picture Archives.
    Last edited by skipjordan; 06-22-2013 at 11:31 AM.

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