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Thread: Maserati Racing Cars History

  1. #16
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    More Cars,
    I hope somebody can add some more.
    Jörg

  2. #17
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    Again
    hope somebody can add some more.
    Jörg

  3. #18
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  4. #19
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    Getting old,
    mixed the Pics up
    Jörg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #20
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    the last Tipo 8 CM Pics
    Jörg

  6. #21
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    Thanks for sharing the pics! And thanks, cmcpokey

    The thread is not done yet

    BTW, Odin, we don't need to doubt about post #1 'strange car' (two last pics there) anymore, as your first post here contains the same DS8198 car named 1930 Tipo 26M (pic #5 in your post). And it seems to me that pics #3 and #4 in my post about Tipo 26M are of the same car. Didn't notice it before... Thanks And what did you mean by 'identifying'? Cuz your pics are named depending on models already. Chassis numbers or something?
    Last edited by faksta; 11-24-2007 at 01:48 PM.

  7. #22
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    Sorry, I'm a little bit obsessed, with Pre-War Racing cars and specially with Maseratis. Unfortunatly there are only a few people in any Forum, who share this passion. My problem is, I'm living a little bit far away, so my only information is the net. When I think, that a few weeks ago was a great auction in London, with very important cars, like the Delage 15-8 S and no one did any report, with pictures, I feel very sad. Is only modern history important?
    Thinking of the Maseratis, it blows my mind up, that you could transform a Grand Prix Car easy to a little streetracer and they did. These are for me real supercars. A used GP car, as daily driver, awesome.
    There is little written about these cars, some are well known, but some, like DS 8198 and all Tipo 26s came to light in the last years. The oldest known Maserati is the Bonfanti Car. I read in the Enrico Page, that the V4 was recreated in England and the V5 in Italy, but with an original Engine. I think its great. But where came the others from? Do you know anything?

    Chassis Numbers would be great. Anybody knows, which ID has Louwmans 8CM? How many still exists?

    Jörg

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odin View Post
    Sorry, I'm a little bit obsessed, with Pre-War Racing cars and specially with Maseratis. Unfortunatly there are only a few people in any Forum, who share this passion. My problem is, I'm living a little bit far away, so my only information is the net. When I think, that a few weeks ago was a great auction in London, with very important cars, like the Delage 15-8 S and no one did any report, with pictures, I feel very sad. Is only modern history important?
    Thinking of the Maseratis, it blows my mind up, that you could transform a Grand Prix Car easy to a little streetracer and they did. These are for me real supercars. A used GP car, as daily driver, awesome.
    There is little written about these cars, some are well known, but some, like DS 8198 and all Tipo 26s came to light in the last years. The oldest known Maserati is the Bonfanti Car. I read in the Enrico Page, that the V4 was recreated in England and the V5 in Italy, but with an original Engine. I think its great. But where came the others from? Do you know anything?

    Chassis Numbers would be great. Anybody knows, which ID has Louwmans 8CM? How many still exists?

    Jörg
    Maseratis are in the pipeline for the main page. Here is Louwman at the wheel of the 8CM during this years FoS at Goodwood. Actually I did not notice/check a chassis plate.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

  9. #24
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    3005.
    If you should see a man walking down a crowded street talking aloud to himself, don't run in the opposite direction, but run towards him, because he's a poet. You have nothing to fear from the poet - but the truth.

    (Ted Joans)

  10. #25
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    Actually one of the best places for identifying the Grand Prix chassis is still Kolumbus for me But it contains info on limited seasons.

    A brief #3005 history from kolumbus:

    3005 and 3006 were narrow chassis cars raced by Sommer and Zehender in 1933. 3005 went back to the factory and was used by Taruffi. It was used by Sommer at Spa 1934 and then used in minor hillclimb events. It ended up in South Africa 1936 (Bill Roderick). 3005 was used by Zehender in 1934 first as a private entry , then as a works car.
    DS-8198 car history :
    13
    Thus, it appears not to be a 1930 car either, but 1926.
    Last edited by faksta; 11-25-2007 at 05:08 AM.

  11. #26
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    1931-1936 Maserati 4CS 1100. Tipo 4CS 1100 appeared as a car to be used in both racing and sports events and had a new 1088cc engine with output of 90-115hp @ 5300-5600rpm. The car made its debut in 1931 in Monza as 4C, but soon rebadged to 4CTR - 'testa riporta' (removable cylinder head). Later appeared 4CM as a racing version and 4CS 1100 to become a sports variant. A very successful racer, Tipo 4CS 1100 won Mille Miglia four times in its class - in 1932 (4CTR 1100, driven by Giuseppe Tuffanelli and Guerino Bertocchi), 1934 (4CS 1100 - Piero Taruffi and Guerino Bertocchi), 1935 (4CS 1100, Ettore Bianco - Guerino Bertocchi) and 1936 (4CS 1100, Ettore Bianco - M.Boccali). In 1932 Brianza Bodyworks built a beautiful yellow spyder presented at that year Mialn Auto Show (what puzzles me is that the original and the modern pics stating seemingly the same car look completely different . Or are they just two different cars?). In common, 6 cars in sports version were produced.

    1. Maserati 4CTR 1100. I suppose it could be a picture of Tuffanelli-Bertocchi at 1932 Mille Miglia.
    2. 4CTR 1100 running a 1933 edition of Mille Miglia in the hands of Domenico Tabanelli and C.Borgnino.
    3. 1933 Maserati 4CS 1100.
    4. 'Original' pic of 1932 Brianza Spyder...
    5. ...and the modern shot of Brianza.
    Last edited by faksta; 11-25-2007 at 06:25 AM.

  12. #27
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    1932 Maserati Tipo V5. As a further development of last year's Formula Libre car - the Tipo V4 - Alfieri Maserati issued a new version by increasing displacement of actually the same coupled V16 engine to 5 liters. The result was impressing - 360hp applied to 1050kg weight lead to maximum speed of 270kmh, which let Amedeo Ruggeri make an attempt to set up a new land speed record in 1932. Record attempts became a major field of Maserati's business after it's founder's death in 1932. Besides, there was some influence from their new partner's side - Pirelli tyre company. Unfortunately, the chassis of V5 were outdated, and such powerful engine caused very strong strain to them. All in all, the trip to Montlhery for setting up the new world record in an outdated car wasn't a good idea. Moreover, Ruggeri had a very little experience of driving at Montlhery. After leaving the West banking on thirteenth lap, Amedeo was flunged out of the cockpit. The car was nearly destructed, Ruggeri died immediately. As for Grand Prix racing, the Tipo V5 was not successful there, too - partly because of Alfa Romeo's new Tipo B P3 cars, which despite on power leak were much lighter, partly because the V5 chassis' age and unreliability. After such failure a rebuilt after Ruggeri's fatal crash Tipo V5 ran only one race in 1934 - Tripoli Grand Prix driven by Piero Taruffi, but on sixth lap retired again because of Taruffi's own driving mistake. Besides automotive racing, those monumental V16 engines appeared at Count Theo Rossi's boat - Montelera XV (or, believing other sources, Baglietto XV). Two engines of opposed rotation were mounted on it, and brought success to Rossi - at 1933 Gardone competitions he reached 114mph - the highest speed for Gardone ever. Together with them, 3 5-liter V16 engines were made and only 1 complete car.

    More on Maserati-engined boats here:
    Maserati Motonautica

    1. Maserati Tipo V5 in 1932.
    2. 1932 Real Premio of Rome - Luigi Fagioli in Tipo V5.
    3. 1932 Monza - Luigi Fagioli comes side by side with Tazio Nuvolari's Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3.
    4. 1934 Tripoli GP - Piero Taruffi stands near to rebuilt Tipo V5. Photo courtesy of Igor Zanisi.
    5. Here it is - 5-liter V16 engine, one of three. Photo courtesy of Igor Zanisi.
    Last edited by faksta; 11-25-2007 at 07:17 AM.

  13. #28
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    1932-1937 Maserati 4CM 1100. To fit in Voiturette class in Grand Prix racing Maserati designed a new car. 4-cylinder straight engine already used in 4CS 1100 and the same car's chassis were taken, and a brand-new narrow aluminium body covered them. In fact, the 4CM 1100 became the first ever single-seater Maserati. Capable of 90 to 125hp, the new engine didn't add much weight to a car - the whole construction weighed 580kg, and the car could run at 185-210kmh. That let 4CM 1100 to record some victories in its list of success. One of the 4CM 1100 cars (#1120) was owned by Gino Rovere and further redeveloped by Giuseppe Furmanik. Furmanik's example finally had 143hp per liter, which was an absolutely outstanding result that times. In 1936 that car with remastered body was used for land speed record attempt. Some of the nine built cars later were rebuilt to fit in the new 1500cc engine.

    1. 1932 Maserati 4CM 1100. Chassis #1116 - second built 4CM 1100.
    2. 4CM 1100 in 1932 - gonna be Furmanik's car, judging on ornament at the bonnet.
    3. Giuseppe Furmanik's 4CM 1100 in 1933.
    4. 1935 Brooklands, Gino Rovere in his very own 4CM 1100.
    5. 1936 Maserati 4CM 1100 'Record'.
    Last edited by faksta; 11-25-2007 at 07:55 AM.

  14. #29
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    Thank you

    Here we go again,
    the Brianza Spider was found 1948 in Eritrea and brought back to England. There it was several times rebodied. The MM Spider, of the destroyed Rosso Bianco Collection was years in the Briggs Cunningham Museum and had an independant front suspension. I don't know, she has an original Body, or was later modified.
    Jörg

  15. #30
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    Some more to complete

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