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Thread: Automotive summer camp?

  1. #1
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    Automotive summer camp?

    I'm a sophomore in highschool and am really interested in cars. I have a bit of money saved up for some sort of summer camp in engineering, and I was wondering if you guys knew any automotive engineering/mechanics summer school in the states. I have found a few places that do engineering in general, but I would love to get more specific and learn about the car.

  2. #2
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    I've never heard of a camp like that. To get a better understanding of how the stuff works, get a a junk and take it apart. Even start with lawnmowers and stuff, take it apart, see how it works, try to put it back together and see if it works.

    Welcome to UCP.
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  3. #3
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    Like j#5 said, you're not going to find a nerd-camp with bunk beds and engineering lessons, or at least I doubt many exist. Go to auto-body shops and ask around. Tell them you're inexperienced but you're willing to help around and are very interested in automobiles and vehicular mechanics. Some might throw a guy of your age away but I bet there are a couple local places that wouldn't mind a helping hand.

    It's not like you can't help a mechanic siphon some brake lines or replace a battery for a few bucks an hour.

  4. #4
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    to be honest that sounds like a very geeky camp. Gauranteed to chase away the laydeez anyway. I do think if you are interested then find people like us to chat with and read/do stuff yourself.

    If its an interest you have try and visit car shows and exhibitions and read some introduction sites (like this one)

    If your serious about a career in automotive engineering, get squared up for the degree requirements (maths, physics, tech studs) if you dont enjoy these subjects a career in any engineering i fear will be difficult for you.
    autozine.org

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockefella View Post
    Like j#5 said, you're not going to find a nerd-camp with bunk beds and engineering lessons, or at least I doubt many exist. Go to auto-body shops and ask around. Tell them you're inexperienced but you're willing to help around and are very interested in automobiles and vehicular mechanics. Some might throw a guy of your age away but I bet there are a couple local places that wouldn't mind a helping hand.

    It's not like you can't help a mechanic siphon some brake lines or replace a battery for a few bucks an hour.
    You'd be surprised how well an approach like that works. A year ago I went to an auto body shop to just learn stuff and help out how ever I could. Now I'm a full time body man there.

    Fuerte, what part of CT do you live in? I might be able to hook you up with some shops cause I used to live down there.
    "We went to Wnedy's. I had chicken nuggest." ~ Quiggs

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jediali View Post
    to be honest that sounds like a very geeky camp. Gauranteed to chase away the laydeez anyway. I do think if you are interested then find people like us to chat with and read/do stuff yourself.

    If its an interest you have try and visit car shows and exhibitions and read some introduction sites (like this one)

    If your serious about a career in automotive engineering, get squared up for the degree requirements (maths, physics, tech studs) if you dont enjoy these subjects a career in any engineering i fear will be difficult for you.
    Actually economics is also something you want when going AE. We get a lot of that either. For example when you designed a nice new suspension, we have to be able to calculate the costs, write a marketing plan, present it in front of hundreds of people and eventually sell it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drakkie View Post
    Actually economics is also something you want when going AE. We get a lot of that either. For example when you designed a nice new suspension, we have to be able to calculate the costs, write a marketing plan, present it in front of hundreds of people and eventually sell it.
    good point, but just question whether you enjoy your subject, thats al.

    As for cost egineering and management etc, much of that is covered in modern engineering degrees. The IMechE (Institute of mechancal engineers) are interested in people that can communicate and adapt as well as have technical ability. So most engineering courses ensure you can present well, debate well, research well and understand markets too.

    Sure for super capable side functions it is useful to have these alternate degrees, but wouldnt it be better to adapt into these roles from an engineer rather than start as an economics graduate (assuming you do 1 degree like most) and find it much harder to grasp the technical side, and on top of that have less respect from the engineers. Its like the fact that until recently there is no graduate roles in project management, project engineers came from experienced engineers.
    autozine.org

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnynumfiv View Post

    Fuerte, what part of CT do you live in? I might be able to hook you up with some shops cause I used to live down there.
    Hey, sorry I didn't respond earlier, this topic completely slipped my mind . Thanks for all the tips, I am really into physics and math. I live down near the Greenwich area. There are a few garages around here and I might go and ask around. So the degrees that help a lot with AE are economics, physics and math?
    Thanks a ton for the site Jed, I bookmarked it and i'm gonna read it later. What do you guys do (if it has to do with autos) and what degrees do you have for it (is this question too personal)?
    "Don't have phone sex, you could get hearing AIDS"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuerte100 View Post
    So the degrees that help a lot with AE are economics, physics and math?
    Yeah, pretty much. Expect to go very deep into calculus and physics, but chemistry will become apparent as well.

  10. #10
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    Originally Posted by _Juan_
    Hi guys,
    Please recommend me some automotive summer camps. My dad wants me to have some practice before a new academic year begins. I didn't write my essay for admission because I haven't decided on the college yet. I thought about Mechanical and Automotive Camp by Hofstra. I'm a student living in Mineola, NY. Any more variants?
    Cheers, Juan

    Hi Juan,
    I doubt you'll find many variants this summer. Practically all colleges have already closed their programs and summer courses due to the pandemic-driven need to minimize social contact. Consider virtual summer programs and online courses perhaps.

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