Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: AMC Ambassador (2nd gen) 1960-1961

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    3,391

    AMC Ambassador (2nd gen) 1960-1961

    The Ambassador was the top-of-the-line automobile produced by the American Motors Corporation (AMC) from 1958 until 1974. The vehicle was known as the Ambassador V-8 by Rambler, Rambler Ambassador, and finally AMC Ambassador during its tenure in production. Previously, the name Ambassador had applied to Nash's "senior" full-size cars.

    The Ambassador nameplate was used continuously from 1927 until 1974 (the name being a top-level trim line between 1927 and 1931); at the time it was discontinued, Ambassador was the longest continuously used car nameplate in automotive history.

    Most Ambassador models were built in Kenosha, Wisconsin. They were also built at AMC's Brampton Assembly in Brampton, Ontario from 1963 to 1966. Australian Motor Industries (AMI) assembled Ambassadors from knock-down kits with right-hand drive from 1961 to 1963. The U.S. fifth generation Ambassadors were produced by Industrias Kaiser Argentina (IKA) in Córdoba, Argentina from 1965 to 1972, as well as assembled by ECASA in Costa Rica from 1965 to 1970. Planta REO assembled first-generation Ambassadors in Mexico at its Monterrey, Nuevo León plant. Fifth and seventh generation Ambassadors were modified into custom stretch limousines in Argentina and the U.S.

    Second generation
    1960
    1960 saw the Ambassador lineup totally reskinned, wearing new fenders, hood, deck lid, door skins, roofline, grille, taillights, bumpers, windshield, and backlight. Significant were the lower hood line, lower windshield cowl, simplified side trim, egg crate grill, while the tailfins were reduced in height and were canted to either side making for a modern and integrated appearance. The overall effect was rather fresh, as the new roof had a lower, lighter look, to complement the lower fins and grille.

    All Ambassadors came equipped with the American Motors 327 cu in (5.4 L) V8, but for the first time it was available in two versions. First was the original 270 hp (201 kW; 274 PS), 360 lb⋅ft (490 N⋅m) of torque, performance version equipped with the 4-barrel carburetor and a 9.7:1 compression ratio, which required premium fuel, and a second economy version running on regular gasoline making 250 hp (186 kW), 340 lb⋅ft (460 N⋅m) of torque, equipped with a 2-barrel carburetor and an 8.7:1 compression ratio.

    Ambassadors now came with a unique compound curved windshield that cut into the roof. This improved visibility, did away with the “knee knocker” dogleg design of AMC's first generation wrap-around windshield, and resulted in an even stiffer unitized structure. The 1960 Ambassador had a low cowl which with the compound windshield afforded excellent visibility. The Ambassador was offered in higher end Custom or entry level Super trim levels. All 1960 Ambassadors came with a new instrument cluster under a padded cowl, as well as illuminated controls for lights, wipers, fan, and defrost functions. The 1960 Ambassadors continued with an enclosed drive shaft (torque tube) and coil springs at all four corners, although the suspension was revised resulting in better handling. The top-of-the-line Ambassador models came standard with individual "airliner" reclining front seats that now had even more luxurious fabrics than in previous years.

    The Ambassador was the only American midsize, luxury high-performance car offered in 1960. The 1960 Ambassador came in 4-door sedan, 4-door pillarless hardtop, 4-door station wagon, and a 4-door pillarless (hardtop) station wagon. Equipped with the 270 horsepower 327 cu in V8, and the Borg Warner pushbutton-operated 3-speed planetary gear and torque converter automatic transmission, the Ambassadors reached 60 miles per hour (97 km/h) in just over 9 seconds and passed the quarter-mile in 17 seconds.

    1961
    The 1961 Ambassador continued the previous year's 117-inch (2,972 mm) basic unitized platform, but received an unusual new front-end styling that was overseen by AMC's in-house design department headed by Edmund Anderson. The new face consisted of a trapezoid grille and headlights that floated in a body-colored panel, while the front fenders arched downward and forward of the leading edge of the hood. Different from anything else on the market, AMC's marketing department promoted the look as "European." While the new look was meant to distinguish the Ambassador from the lower-priced Ramblers, it was neither a consumer success nor well received in the automotive press. Overall sales fell as the entire industry was experiencing a recession. The hardtop sedan and wagon models did not return for 1961.

    Standard was the 250 hp (186 kW; 253 PS) 327 cu in (5.4 L) V8 with a synchromesh manual transmission. Optional was the 270 hp (201 kW; 274 PS) "power pack" version with dual exhaust system featuring new ceramic-coated mufflers guaranteed for the life of the car.

    Source: Wikipedia
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Man of Steel; 04-05-2020 at 01:02 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,652
    AMC Ambassador (2nd gen) #2

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. AMC Ambassador (1st gen) 1958-1959
    By Man of Steel in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-05-2020, 12:56 AM
  2. Plymouth Fury (2nd gen) 1960-1961
    By Revo in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-12-2020, 03:09 PM
  3. BMW 700 RS 1961
    By McLareN in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-18-2015, 10:25 AM
  4. Austin Ambassador 1982-1984
    By Ferrer in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-29-2013, 08:11 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •