Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: AMC Ambassador (5th gen) 1965-1966

Threaded View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    33,457
    The Ambassador was the top-of-the-line automobile produced by the American Motors Corporation (AMC) from 1958 until 1974. The vehicle was known as the Ambassador V-8 by Rambler, Rambler Ambassador, and finally AMC Ambassador during its tenure in production. Previously, the name Ambassador had applied to Nash's "senior" full-size cars.

    The Ambassador nameplate was used continuously from 1927 until 1974 (the name being a top-level trim line between 1927 and 1931); at the time it was discontinued, Ambassador was the longest continuously used car nameplate in automotive history.

    Most Ambassador models were built in Kenosha, Wisconsin. They were also built at AMC's Brampton Assembly in Brampton, Ontario from 1963 to 1966. Australian Motor Industries (AMI) assembled Ambassadors from knock-down kits with right-hand drive from 1961 to 1963. The U.S. fifth generation Ambassadors were produced by Industrias Kaiser Argentina (IKA) in Córdoba, Argentina from 1965 to 1972, as well as assembled by ECASA in Costa Rica from 1965 to 1970. Planta REO assembled first-generation Ambassadors in Mexico at its Monterrey, Nuevo León plant. Fifth and seventh generation Ambassadors were modified into custom stretch limousines in Argentina and the U.S.

    Fifth generation
    1965
    No matter how much success the new Ramblers achieved in the marketplace, Roy Abernethy was not completely satisfied. Using the experience he gained as an outstanding salesman as a guide, Abernethy closely looked at the direction that American Motors' competition was going and decided that the company would be much more successful if its products competed more directly with the Big Three. He would achieve this by pushing all AMC vehicles further upmarket among the various market segments, shaking off the company's economy car image, and offering vehicles once again in all three major American car size classes: compact, intermediate, and full-size. The American and Classic were strong competitors in the former two segments, so for the 1965 model year, he set his sights on turning the Ambassador into a proper full-size car by stretching the Classic's wheelbase and giving it much different styling. The general sizes of automobiles at that time were based on industry standard wheelbase lengths, rather than on the vehicle's interior and cargo space. The 1965 Ambassador represented a fundamental shift in corporate ideology, a shift away from primarily fuel-efficient vehicles, to bigger, faster, and potentially more profitable cars.

    Although the Ambassador rode the same platform as its 1963–64 forebears, the 1965 models looked all-new. American Motors' designer Richard A. Teague styled the 1965 Ambassador with panache and gave the car an overall integrated look. Motor Trend magazine agreed, calling it a "strikingly handsome automobile." Built on a 116-inch (2,946 mm) wheelbase four inches (100 mm) longer than the Classic, Teague extended the beltline level from the stacked quad headlights to the vertical taillights. The new Ambassadors were as attractive as anything built by AMC's Detroit-based competitors, and with a list price of around $3,000, few could quibble about the cost of ownership. New disc brakes with a power brakes were optional.

    The Ambassador received longer, squared-off rear fenders with vertical wrap-around taillights, taller decklid, squared off rear bumper mounted low, and squarer rear wheel arches. At the front, the Ambassador again sparked minor controversy with its new vertically stacked quad headlights, which were slightly recessed in their bezels, as they flanked an all-new horizontal bar grille. This new wall-to-wall grille projected forward, horizontally, in the center, to create an effect somewhat opposite to 1963's grille treatment. The front end design provided a bold, rugged appearance.

    Once again, the Ambassador’s entire extra wheelbase was ahead of the cowl, meaning that interior volume was the same as the intermediate-sized Classic. Another new body style debuted in the Ambassador lineup for 1965: an attractive new convertible offered as part of the 990 series. This was the first time a convertible was offered in the Ambassador line since 1948. All Ambassador body styles (except the 990-H coupe) offered seating for six passengers, with coupes and convertibles having the option of buckets seats with center console and floor shifter. The Ambassador 990-H was an up-scale two-door hardtop model, available only in 5-passenger form.

    Ambassadors also saw an expanded list of trim lines, convenience options, and engine choices. The 990 and 990-H models were back, while 880 models were the new economy leaders in the 1965 Ambassador line, but even the $2,512 price for the two-door sedan was not attractive compared to the models with better trim, buckets seats, and special interiors.[23] Ambassadors came standard with AMC's new 232 cu in (3.8 L) Inline-6 engine, which was the first time since 1956 that an Ambassador was available with six cylinders. Far more popular in the Ambassador, however, were the two time-tested 287 and 327 cu in (4.7 and 5.4 L) AMC V8 engines.

    American Motors' management decided that the Ambassador could once again accept a standard six-cylinder engine, since its full-size competitors (e. g. Bel Air and Impala, Ford Custom 500 and Galaxie, as well as Plymouth Fury) came with six-cylinder engines as standard equipment. They therefore appealed to a wider range of customers than the Ambassador was getting. Also, since the Classic was now smaller and styled differently, the Ambassador six-cylinder would not threaten to cannibalize Classic 6 sales, which were the company's sales volume leaders. The changes were on target as sales of the repositioned Ambassador more than tripled.

    Motor Trend magazine tested an Ambassador convertible with a Twin-Stick overdrive transmission and found it commendably economical, averaging 16.4 mpg‑US (14.3 L/100 km; 19.7 mpg‑imp) over 1,000 miles (1,600 km) run, and noting that ... "Traveling comfort was the Ambassador's biggest selling point, along with its exceptionally powerful Bendix duo-servo drum brakes ...With the thin bucket seats that recline, driver and passengers can enjoy a high degree of riding comfort... Many passers-by commented on the car's good looks... Our summary: a nice, comfortable, quiet, well built family automobile that rather neglects the performance market."

    Source: Wikipedia
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Man of Steel; 04-05-2020 at 01:39 AM.
    Lack of charisma can be fatal.
    Visca Catalunya!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. AMC Ambassador (3rd gen) 1962
    By Man of Steel in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-05-2020, 01:11 AM
  2. AMC Ambassador (2nd gen) 1960-1961
    By Sauc3 in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-05-2020, 01:03 AM
  3. Pontiac Star Chief (6th gen) 1965-1966
    By Man of Steel in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-25-2020, 11:15 PM
  4. Cadillac Eldorado (6th gen) 1965-1966
    By Duell in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-12-2013, 12:51 PM
  5. Abarth 2000 OT Sport Spider (Tipo 136) 1965-1966
    By Ferrer in forum Matt's Hi-Res Hide-Out
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-15-2012, 04:08 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •