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Thread: Ford Sierra RS Cosworth 1986-1992

  1. #1
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    Ford Sierra RS Cosworth 1986-1992

    The Ford Sierra RS Cosworth is a high-performance version of the Ford Sierra that was built by Ford Europe from 1986 to 1992. It was the result of a Ford Motorsport project with the purpose of producing an outright winner for Group A racing in Europe.

    Development
    The project was defined by Stuart Turner in the spring of 1983. He had recently been appointed head of Ford Motorsport in Europe, and he realised right away that Ford was no longer competitive in this area.

    Turner got in touch with Walter Hayes, at the time the vice-president of public relations at Ford, to get support for the project. Hayes had earlier been the driving force behind the development of the Ford GT40 that won Le Mans in 1966, and the Cosworth DFV engine that brought Ford 154 victories and 12 world championships in Formula One during the 1960s and 1970s. Hayes found the project very appealing and promised his full support.

    Turner then invited Ken Kohrs, vice-president of development, to visit Ford's longtime partner, the automotive company Cosworth, where they were presented a project developed on Cosworth's own initiative, the YAA engine. This was a twin cam, 16-valve engine based on Ford's own T88 engine block, better known as the Pinto. This prototype proved an almost ideal basis for the engine Turner needed to power his Group A winner.

    Therefore, an official request for a turbocharged version (designated Cosworth YBB) capable of 180 HP on the street and 300 HP in race trim, was placed. Cosworth answered positively, but they put up two conditions: the engine would produce not less than 150 kW (204 HP) in the street version, and Ford had to accept no fewer than 15,000 engines. Turner's project would only need about 5,000 engines, but Ford nevertheless accepted the conditions. The extra 10,000 engines would later become one of the reasons Ford also chose to develop a four-door, second generation, Sierra RS Cosworth.

    To find a suitable gearbox proved more challenging. The Borg-Warner T5, also used in the Ford Mustang, was chosen, but the higher revving nature of the Sierra caused some problems. Eventually Borg-Warner had to set up a dedicated production line for the gearboxes to be used in the Sierra RS Cosworth.

    Many of the suspension differences between the standard Sierra and the Cosworth attributed their development to what was learned from racing the turbocharged Jack Roush IMSA Merkur XR4Ti in America and Andy Rouse's successful campaign of the 1985 British Saloon Car Championship. Much of Ford's external documentation for customer race preparation indicated "developed for the XR4Ti" when describing parts that were Sierra Cosworth specific. Roush's suspension and aerodynamics engineering for the IMSA cars was excellent feedback for Ford. Some production parts from the XR4Ti made their way into the Cosworth such as the speedometer with integral boost gauge and the motorsport 909 chassis stiffening plates.

    In April 1983, Turner's team decided on the Sierra as a basis for their project. The Sierra filled the requirements for rear wheel drive and decent aerodynamic drag. A racing version could also help to improve the poor, and somewhat undeserved, reputation that the Sierra had earned since its introduction in 1982.

    Lothar Pinske, responsible for the car's bodywork, demanded carte blanche when it came to appearance in order to make the car stable at high speed. Experience had shown that the Sierra hatchback body generated significant aerodynamic lift even at relatively moderate speed.

    After extensive wind tunnel testing and test runs at the Narḍ circuit in Italy, a prototype was presented to the project management. This was based on an XR4i body with provisional body modifications in fibreglass and aluminium. The car's appearance raised little enthusiasm. The large rear wing caused particular reluctance. Pinske insisted, however, that the modifications were necessary to make the project successful. The rear wing was essential to retain ground contact at 300 km/h, the opening between the headlights was needed to feed air to the intercooler and the wheel arch extensions had to be there to house wheels 10” wide on the racing version. Eventually, the Ford designers agreed to try to make a production version based on the prototype.

    In 1984, Walter Hayes paid visits to many European Ford dealers in order to survey the sales potential for the Sierra RS Cosworth. A requirement for participation in Group A was that 5,000 cars were built and sold. The feedback was not encouraging. The dealers estimated they could sell 1,500 cars.

    Hayes did not give up, however, and continued his passionate internal marketing of the project. As prototypes started to emerge, dealers were invited to test-drive sessions, and this increased the enthusiasm for the new car. In addition, Ford took some radical measures to reduce the price on the car. As an example, the car was only offered in three exterior colours (black, white and moonstone blue) and one interior colour (grey). There were also just two equipment options: with or without central locking and electric window lifts.

    Production
    The Ford Sierra RS Cosworth was first presented to the public at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1985, with plans to release it for sale in September and closing production of the 5,000 cars in the summer of 1986.

    In practice, it was launched in July 1986, and 5545 were manufactured in total of which 500 were sent to Tickford for conversion to the Sierra three-door RS500 Cosworth. The vehicles were manufactured in right hand drive (RHD) only, and were made in Ford's Genk factory in Belgium.

    As published in the 1986 RS catalog:

    - Max speed: 149 mph
    - 0-60 mph: 6.5 sec
    - Fuel consumption at 56 mph: 38.2 mpg
    - Fuel consumption at 75 mph: 30.1 mpg
    - Drag coefficient: 0.345
    - Rear spoiler: 20kgf at 150 mph
    - Front brakes: Disc 28.3 cm diameter
    - Rear brakes: Disc 27.3 cm diameter
    - Differential: Viscous coupled limited slip
    - Tyre size: 205/50 VRx15
    - Wheels: 15"x7" alloys

    Source: Wikipedia
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    Last edited by Man of Steel; 01-01-2021 at 04:29 PM.
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  2. #2
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    The 2l engine for the Sierra WAS the Pinto engine

    What you MIGHT ahve been interested in was the Sierra COSWORHT RS500 engine.
    Hmmm, spitting flames, barking exhaust, lots of wheelspin.
    One of the most evil turbos on the circuit !!!!
    Mates racing one at the mo


    Sierra RS500 Cosworth
    Mike Moreton was head of the team that planned to develop an evolution edition aimed at making the car unbeatable on the race tracks. In March 1987, Aston Martin Tickford was signed for the job of converting the 500 cars.

    The Cosworth RS500 was announced in July 1987, and was homologated in August 1987.

    The main difference to the Sierra three-door Cosworth was Cosworth's uprated competition engine. Its new features were:
    - The Inline-four engine had a thicker walled cylinder block to cope with the rigours of the track
    - Bore X Stroke of 90.8 mm (3.57 in) X 77 mm (3.03 in)
    - Displacement of 1,993 cc (2.0 L; 121.6 cu in)
    - A larger Garrett AiResearch T04 turbocharger
    - A larger air-air intercooler
    - A second set of four Weber IW025 "yellow" fuel injectors and a second fuel rail (not activated in the roadgoing version)
    - An uprated fuel pump
    - A reworked induction system to allow higher power outputs to be realised
    - An uprated oil and cooling system
    - The rear semi-trailing arm beam had extended but unused mounting points
    - Engine output increased to 227 PS (224 hp; 167 kW) at 6000 rpm
    - Max. torque of 277 N⋅m (204 lb⋅ft) at 4500 rpm.

    The RS500 also had minor external cosmetic differences to its parent the Sierra three-door Cosworth:
    - The rear tailgate had a lower spoiler in addition to the upper "whale tail"
    - Discreet RS500 badges on the rear tailgate and front wings
    - A redesigned front bumper and spoiler to aid cooling and air flow, including the removal of the fog lamps and their replacement with intake grilles to supplement brake cooling

    Exactly 500 RS500s were produced, all of them RHD for sale in the UK only - the biggest market for this kind of Ford car. It was originally intended that all 500 would be black, but in actuality 56 white and 52 moonstone blue cars were produced.

    Some European tuners, missing a LHD RS500 version, have set up some elaborate versions of the Sierra RS Cosworth for private customers, replicating some of the RS500's specs. The most famous tuner dedicated to this project was Wolf Racing, who was already racing and winning as official team with the Sierra from 1986 through 1989 in the German touring car championship Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters.

    The declared power was 260 PS, although some owners claim at least 40 PS more. From 1986 through 1989 (nearly two years after the end of production of the first series), 10 street-legal RS500 replicas -in Ford's moonstone blue colour- were manufactured.

    Source: Wikipedia
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    Last edited by Man of Steel; 01-01-2021 at 04:32 PM.
    "A woman without curves is like a road without bends, you might get to your destination quicker but the ride is boring as hell'

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matra et Alpine

    The 2l engine for the Sierra WAS the Pinto engine

    What you MIGHT ahve been interested in was the Sierra COSWORHT RS500 engine.
    Hmmm, spitting flames, barking exhaust, lots of wheelspin.
    One of the most evil turbos on the circuit !!!!
    Mates racing one at the mo
    I saw a guy trying to drift one of those at this thing me and my mate went to at Silverstone earlier this year. It was so entertaining to watch, he'd give it the flick, the back would begin to step out, then he'd try and feather the throttle, EVERY single time he tried it, you could see the turbo kick and he'd end up facing the oncoming cars. So damn funny.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by VtecMini
    I saw a guy trying to drift one of those at this thing me and my mate went to at Silverstone earlier this year.
    You mean the UKD1 championship??

    Not exactly "just some thing" lolol

    J.

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    Erm... Honestly can't remember! I think it was called "Drift Challenge". I don't recall it being a massive event. We didn't stay long cos it was damn cold.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matra et Alpine

    The 2l engine for the Sierra WAS the Pinto engine

    What you MIGHT ahve been interested in was the Sierra COSWORHT RS500 engine.
    Hmmm, spitting flames, barking exhaust, lots of wheelspin.
    One of the most evil turbos on the circuit !!!!
    Mates racing one at the mo

    The standard RS500 has not that many differences from the stock version. But has it was an homologation special, it had another turbo and so.

    The RS500's we've seen at races, they're another story! They're amazing!
    Money can't buy you friends, but you do get a better class of enemy.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by McReis
    The standard RS500 has not that many differences from the stock version. But has it was an homologation special, it had another turbo and so.
    The '500s were still only single turbo, but a huge T34.

    Tickford parts upgrade for RS500s -
    - Stronger cylinder block.
    - Bigger T3/4 turbocharger.
    - Larger intercooler.
    - Second fuel injection rail (Extra 4 injectros were fitted, but weren't functioning in road trim).
    - improved rear suspension to lay down the power without suspension wind-up
    I think the confusion is over the 2nd injection rail.
    The RS500's we've seen at races, they're another story! They're amazing!
    In 'homologation' trim these put out 240bhp from 2l Pinto.
    In Tickford prepared RS500 rally/race trim they put out 500bhp.
    It's the latter that were the real fire-spitters that the ricers so much wannabee
    They were more succesful on track as the huge lag in the full-on versions was too severe to be usable on forest/grvel stages. But didn't stop it winning !!!
    "A woman without curves is like a road without bends, you might get to your destination quicker but the ride is boring as hell'

  8. #8
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    This is how I like to be answered: with pure an exact automotive culture!

    Thank you!
    Money can't buy you friends, but you do get a better class of enemy.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matra et Alpine
    In 'homologation' trim these put out 240bhp from 2l Pinto.
    In Tickford prepared RS500 rally/race trim they put out 500bhp.
    to be more exact the road trim was pushing 224 ps (20 more than the standard RS Cosworth). The BTCC cars could push 560ps (e.g. Labatts RS500 of Andy Rouse)...

    some pics of the racers...







    Currently there are cars which push more than 700 rwhp!!!!

  10. #10
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    wowie ive been watching a few videos (1987-1992) of the great race, the Tickford sierras that entered were amazing but so were the skylines
    Cedric - I sound like a chipmunk on there. Some friends of mine were like, "were you going through puberty?" I was like, no I was already 20, I just sound like a girl.

  11. #11
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    I saw a street Sierra RS Cosworth 500! I have pix, too!
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    Ford Sierra RS Cosworth Sapphire

    This beast ruled the streets of Britain back in the late '80s and early '90s, and soon developed a reputation as the car to have by illegal means. It became the most-targeted car in Britain at one point, its huge speed and comfortable room making it the car of choice for ram-raids and getaways.

    They were also taken just for kicks, and the police had to buy them to keep up with them. Insurance premiums rocketed, and the Cosworth died an undignified death in 1991. A sad end for a legendary car.

    Available in RWD or AWD, the AWD has the urban legends of being the 'better' car- but ask any owner of both, and they'll tell you that the RWD one is the one to have. The 2.0 I4 engine, fettled by Cosworth and turbocharged, put out 204bhp and 205 lb/ft of torque- but very few remain in their original state. They are bought and modified hugely by owners (who also stick tasteless wheels and crappy bodykits on them).

    The performance figures today are still very respectable. 0-60 is achieved in around 6 seconds (the figures vary between 5.8 and 6.1 seconds), 0-100 is 15.4 seconds, a quarter-mile of 14.4 seconds and a top speed of 150 mph. This is due to a light weight (1200kg), a vicious engine and the car's reluctance to unstick itself from the Tarmac. Wheelspin is rarely encountered, therefore the car just gets the job done- ruthlessly.

    Inside, you get the Ghia spec (and then some)- a full complement of leather; all the gadgets (that were new in 1988); and electric everything. If you're considering buying one, remember that the electrics never really worked back then, so don't expect reliability now! There is space to seat 4 comfortably, and 5 at a squeeze. An interesting sidenote- if you drive with the windows open, the aerodynamics draft the exhaust fumes into the car.

    Outside, you get a subtle bodykit, spoiler, and some very attractive alloys. The outrageous styling of the original 3-door Cosworth was toned-down for a 'wolf in sheep's clothing' effect. The car works well in low-key colours, such as black and grey.
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    More...

    (This one has 270bhp, but is mainly standard. Beautiful example.)
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    The engine...
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    why am i not impressed?
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