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Thread: Inline dieing??

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    1,508
    Not quite a built but they are slowly becoming more popular. Some people claim it's because we had bad experience with diesel cars in the late 70s and early 80s. I don't buy that. Too many people now wouldn't know the difference. Lots of people like diesel pickups. Personally I think its more mundane factors. First, our emissions laws haven't been very diesel friendly. That keeps a lot of the car companies from wanting to bring them over. Why put all that marketing effort into a diesel if California might get a bug up it's tail pipe and pass new emissions laws that diesels can't meet? It also didn't help that we had higher sulfur content in our gas for quite some time (now changing).
    The other reasons are more economic. Diesel engine options cost a lot yet generally don't provide anything more than better mileage. While gas was cheep (and still isn't too expensive) people were happier saving the up front cost. While the new diesels are much better my impression (little first hand experience) is that they aren't really better than many of the gas offerings but for fuel economy. They are very torquy but don't rev much. I think for many people they might go too far in the other direction as compared to the ultra high reving s2000. Also, we can get that extra low end torque via more displacement which costs little in comparison to a smaller displacement motor. Why bother with a torquy 2.0L I4 when I can get a 3L V6 for less. I think when VW was offering the diesel Jetta it costs as much as the 1.8T or VR6 motor (one or the other).
    Anyway, while the newest ones are smooth and quick they really aren't any smoother or quicker than most of the gas options. The engines cost more and diesel fuel costs more. It doesn't make for a very compelling case in the US. I suspect with out some major change in market forces (fuel costs, lower up front costs) diesels will never become as common as they are in Europe. Their are some arguments for them but they aren't that compelling in the US market.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    33,495
    Quote Originally Posted by henk4
    some people may expect this comment from me, but this is really why I choose a diesel, low end punch is there, and it is actually all you need to get going very quickly...
    No I wasn't expecting that... Altough supercharged petrol engines can also pull cleanly from very low speeds. An automatic gearbox also helps masking the lack of low-end punch.

    About taxation based on the engine's displacement, isn't that the way it's done on almost all (or all) of Europe?
    Lack of charisma can be fatal.
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  3. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    2,975
    Quote Originally Posted by Ferrer
    No I wasn't expecting that... Altough supercharged petrol engines can also pull cleanly from very low speeds. An automatic gearbox also helps masking the lack of low-end punch.

    About taxation based on the engine's displacement, isn't that the way it's done on almost all (or all) of Europe?
    currently based on carbon dioxide in UK
    autozine.org

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rozenburg, Holland
    Posts
    27,323
    Quote Originally Posted by jediali
    currently based on carbon dioxide in UK

    weight in Holland, with some special regulations for LPG and Diesel cars.
    "I find the whole business of religion profoundly interesting, but it does mystify me that otherwise intelligent people take it seriously." Douglas Adams

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