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Old 08-09-2011, 01:52 PM
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Chevrolet Vega 1970-1977

Chevrolet Vega #1
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Old 08-09-2011, 01:54 PM
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Chevrolet Vega #2
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File Type: jpg 1977 Chevrolet Vega Estate Wagon.jpg (299.2 KB, 3 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:38 AM
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The Chevrolet Vega is a subcompact automobile that was produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors (GM) from 1970 to 1977. Available in two-door hatchback, notchback, wagon, and panel delivery body styles, all models were powered by an inline four-cylinder engine with a lightweight, aluminum alloy cylinder block. Variants included the Vega GT high-performance style and the Cosworth Vega, a short-lived limited-production performance model, introduced in March 1975.

The Vega received praise and awards at its introduction, including 1971 Motor Trend Car of the Year. Subsequently the car became widely known for a range of problems related to its engineering, reliability, safety, propensity to rust, and engine durability. Despite a series of recalls and design upgrades, the Vega's problems tarnished both its own as well as General Motors' reputation. Production ended with the 1977 model year.

The name is derived from Vega, the brightest star in the constellation Lyra.

History

Chevrolet and Pontiac divisions worked separately on small cars in the early and mid 1960s. Ed Cole, GM's executive vice-president of operating staffs, working on his own small-car project with corporate engineering and design staffs, presented the program to GM's president in 1967. GM chose Cole's version over proposals from Chevrolet and Pontiac, and gave the car to Chevrolet to sell. Corporate management made the decisions to enter the small car market and to develop the car itself.

In 1968, GM chairman James Roche announced GM would produce the new car in the U.S. in two years. Ed Cole was chief engineer and Bill Mitchell, vice-president of design staff, was chief stylist. Cole wanted a world-beater in showrooms in 24 months. A GM design team was set up, headed by James G. Musser, Jr. who had helped develop the Chevy II, the Camaro, the Chevrolet small-block V8 engines, and the Turbo-Hydramatic transmission. Musser said, "This was the first vehicle where one person was in charge,” and his team “did the entire vehicle." As GM president, Cole oversaw the car's genesis and met the projected schedule.

Development 1968-1970

The Vega was conceived in 1968 to utilize newly developed all-aluminum die-cast engine block technology – the first sand-cast aluminum blocks had preceded the decision to build the car by two years. A relatively large displacement engine with good low- speed torque was decided on, with gear ratios for low engine rpm to achieve economy. Engine testing totalled 6,000,000 miles. A pre-test engine was installed in a Fiat 124 sedan for development of the aluminum block, while several 1968 Opel sedans were used for drive train development

Chevrolet instituted a new management program, the car line management technique, to produce the all-new car in two years. The chief vehicle engineer had overall charge of the program. 50 engineers, dedicated to the design of the entire car, were divided into groups: body, power train, chassis design, product assurance, and pleasability. The latter would check continuously on the vehicles on the assembly line, with computers in another program monitoring quality control of every vehicle built. Fisher Body engineers and draftsmen moved in with the Vega personnel.

In October 1968, there was one body style (the "11" style notchback sedan), one engine, one transmission (MB1 Torque-Drive manually shifted two-speed automatic), one base trim level, a bench seat, molded rubber floor covering, no glove box or headliner and no air-conditioning (ventilation was through the upper dash from the wiper plenum). As the market changed, so did the car in development.

In December 1968, hatchback, wagon, and panel delivery styles were added; also floor-level ventilation, and an optional performance engine ("L-11" two-barrel) which, predicted as 20% of production, accounted for 75%. Bucket seats were standard. Hatchback and wagon received carpeting and headliners. Optional air conditioning, predicted as 10% of production, rose to 45%.

In February 1969, Opel three- and four-speed transmissions (three-speed standard, others optional); Powerglide were added (now four transmissions); mechanical fuel pump replaced by in-tank electric pump; power steering option; base "11" style notchback trim upgraded to match hatchback and wagon carpet and headliner.

In April 1969, the car gained gauge-pack cluster, HD suspension, wide tires; adjustable seat back (45% of production); bumpers restyled, lower valance panels added; swing-out quarter window option (10% of production).

In July 1969, an electrically heated backlite option (10% of production); "GT" package, $325.00 extra (35% of production); bright window-frame and roof drip moldings added to hatchback and wagon.

This is essentially how the car launched as a 1971 model. Production began on June 26, 1970. After the national GM strike (September to November 1970), bright roof drip moldings were added to the base "11" notchback, with moldings sent to dealers to update units already in the field.

Cars magazine said in 1974 that in the rush to introduce the car with other 1971 models "[t]ests which should have been at the proving grounds were performed by customers, necessitating numerous piecemeal "fixes" by dealers. Chevrolet's "bright star" received an enduring black eye despite a continuing development program which eventually alleviated most of these initial shortcomings."

Design and engineering

The wheelbase on all models is 97.0 inches (2,460 mm). Width is 65.4 inches (1,660 mm). 1971 and 1972 models are 169.7 inches (4,310 mm) long. 1973 models are 3 inches (76 mm) longer due to the front 5 mph bumper. Front and rear 5 mph bumpers on 1974 to 1977 models add another 5.7 inches (140 mm).

The Hatchback Coupe with its lower roofline and a fold-down rear seat accounted for nearly half of all Vegas sold. The Sedan, later named Notchback is the only Vega model with an enclosed trunk, and had the lowest base price. The Kammback wagon has a lower cargo liftover height and a swing-up liftgate. The Panel Express panel delivery model has steel panels in place of the wagon's rear side glass, an enclosed storage area under the load floor, and a low-back driver's seat. An auxiliary passenger seat was optional.

The aluminum-block inline-four engine was a joint effort by General Motors, Reynolds Metals, and Sealed Power Corp. The engine and its die-cast block technology were developed by GM engineering staff, then passed to Chevrolet for finalization and production. Ed Cole, involved with the 1955 small-block V8 as chief engineer at Chevrolet and now equally involved with the Vega engine as GM president, often visited the engineering staff engine drafting room on Saturdays, reviewing the design and directing changes, to the consternation of Chevrolet engineers and manufacturing personnel, who knew he wanted a rush job. The engine in development became known in-house as "the world's tallest, smallest engine" due to the tall cylinder head Its vibration, noise, and tendency to overheat were rectified by 1974.

The Vega’s suspension, live rear axle, 53.2% front/46.8% rear weight distribution, low center of mass and neutral steering give good handling. Lateral acceleration capacities are 0.90 g (standard suspension) and 0.93 g (RPO F-41 suspension). Steering box and linkage are ahead of the front wheel centerline, with a cushioned two-piece shaft. Front suspension is by short and long arms, with lower control arm bushings larger than on the 1970 Camaro. Four-link rear suspension copies the 1970 Chevelle. There are coil springs all round.

The chassis development engineers aimed for full-size American car ride qualities with European handling. Later torque-arm rear suspension eliminated rear wheel hop under panic braking. Brakes (front discs, rear drums) copy an Opel design, with 10-inch (250 mm) diameter single-piston solid rotors, 9-inch (230 mm) drums and 70/30 front/rear braking distribution.

All models share the same hood, fenders, floor pan, lower door panels, rocker panels, engine compartment and front end. In mid-1971, Chevrolet introduced an optional GT package for Hatchback and Kammback models, which included the RPO L11 two-barrel 140 engine, F41 handling option, special tires and trim.
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg chevrolet_vega_3.jpeg (2.21 MB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_3-door_hatchback_coupe_1.jpg (137.9 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpeg chevrolet_vega_4.jpeg (1.09 MB, 1 views)
File Type: jpeg chevrolet_vega_5.jpeg (2.19 MB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_kammback_wagon_1.jpg (655.7 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_kammback_wagon_2.jpg (187.4 KB, 3 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:39 AM
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Model year changes

1972 models had a revised exhaust system and driveline to reduce vibration and noise; also revised shock absorbers. Turbo-hydramatic three-speed automatic transmission and custom cloth interior were optional and a glove box was added.

For 1973, 300 changes included new exterior and interior colors and new standard interior trim. Front and rear nameplate scripts "Chevrolet Vega 2300" were changed to "VEGA by Chevrolet". To meet the 1973 5 mph front bumper standards the front bumper, on stronger brackets, was extended 3 inches (76 mm), with a steel body-color filler panel. US-built Saginaw manual transmissions and a new shift linkage replaced the Opel units. The RPO L11 engine had a new Holley 5210C progressive two-barrel carburetor. New options included BR70-13 white-stripe steel-belted radial tires, full wheel covers, and body side molding with black rubber insert. Two new models were introduced mid-year: the Estate Wagon with wood grain sides and rear trim, and the LX Notchback with vinyl roof finish. On May 17, 1973, the millionth Vega left the Lordstown Assembly plant – an orange GT Hatchback with white sport stripes, power steering and neutral custom vinyl interior including exclusive vinyl door panels. A limited-edition "Millionth Vega" was introduced replicating the milestone car, with orange carpeting and Millionth Vega door handle accents. 6500 were built May 1 to July 1.

For 1974, the major exterior changes were a revised front end and 5 mph rear bumper, increasing overall length 6 inches (150 mm), and a slanted front header panel with recessed headlamp bezels. Louvered steel replaced the egg-crate plastic grille. Front and rear aluminum bumpers with inner steel spring replaced the chrome items, with license plate mountings relocated. A revised rear panel on Notchback and Hatchback models had larger single-unit taillights, with ventilation grills eliminated from trunk and hatch lids. A 16-US-gallon (61 l; 13 imp gal) fuel tank replaced the 11-US-gallon (42 l; 9.2 imp gal) tank. Side striping replaced the hood/deck stripes for the GT sport stripes option. The custom interior's wood-trimmed molded door panels were replaced by vinyl door panels matching the seat trim. January saw plastic front fender liners added after thousands of fenders were replaced under warranty on 1971–1974 models. In February the "Spirit of America" limited-edition hatchback was introduced, with white exterior, white vinyl roof, blue and red striping on body sides, hood and rear-end panel, emblems on front fenders and rear panel, white "GT" wheels, A70-13 raised white-letter tires, white custom vinyl interior and red accent color carpeting. 7,500 Vegas were built through May. Sales peaked at 460,374 for the 1974 model year.

The 264 changes for 1975 included H.E.I. (High-energy) electronic ignition and a catalytic converter. New options included power brakes, tilt steering wheel, BR78-13B steel belted radial tires, and special custom cloth interior for the Hatchback and Kammback. In March the Cosworth Vega was introduced with an all-aluminum engine and electronic fuel injection, the first on a Chevrolet passenger car. The Panel Express was discontinued at the end of the model year. Its sales peaked at 7,800 in its first year, then averaged 4,000 per year. 1,525 1975 models were sold. Total sales fell to 206,239.

1976 models had 300 changes. A facelift included revised header panel with Chevy bowtie emblem, wider grill, revised headlamp bezels – all in corrosion-resistant material – and new tri-color taillights for the Notchback and Hatchback (although the amber turn signals were nonfunctional). Cooling and durability of the Dura-Built 2.3-liter engine were improved. The chassis received the Monza's upgraded components including box-section front cross-member, larger front and rear brakes (with the fronts gaining vented rotors), and torque-arm rear suspension. Extensive anti-rust improvements to the body included galvanized fenders and rocker panels. New models were introduced: GT Estate wagon, Cabriolet Notchback (with a half-vinyl roof and opera windows similar to the Monza Towne Coupe) and limited-edition Nomad Wagon with restyled side windows. New options included BorgWarner five-speed manual overdrive transmission and houndstooth seat trim named "sport cloth" at an additional $18. A "Sky-Roof" with tinted reflecting sliding glass and an 8-track tape player were options from January. The Cosworth was canceled in July after 1,446 1976 models.

1977 models had few revisions. The Notchback was renamed Coupe. On the Dura-built 140 engine a pulse-air system met stricter Federal emission standards. The single-barrel engine and three-speed manual transmission were dropped. Interiors received color-keyed steering column, steering wheel, instrument cluster face and parking brake cover, with color-keyed full console a new option. GTs received black exterior moldings (lower moldings deleted), black sport mirrors and wheels, bold Vega GT side striping and rear Vega GT I.D.

Engine

The Vega engine was a 2,287 cc (2.3 L; 139.6 cu in) inline-four with a die-cast aluminum alloy cylinder block, cast-iron cylinder head and single overhead camshaft (SOHC). The block was an open-deck design with siamesed cylinder bores. The outer case walls form the water jacket, sealed off by the head and head gasket, and the block has cast-iron main caps and crankshaft. The cast-iron cylinder head was chosen for low cost. A simple overhead valvetrain has three components activating each valve instead of a typical pushrod system's seven. An external belt from the crankshaft drives the five-bearing camshaft plus the water pump and fan.

Compression ratio for the standard and optional engine is 8.0:1, as the engine was designed for low-lead and lead-free fuels. The single-barrel carburetor version produced 90 hp (67 kW); the two-barrel version (RPO L11) produced 110 hp (82 kW). From 1972, ratings were listed as SAE net. The engine is prone to vibration, which is damped by large rubber engine mounts. The 1972 Rochester DualJet two-barrel carburetor required an air pump for emission certification and was replaced in 1973 with a Holley-built 5210C progressive two-barrel carburetor. 1973 emission control revisions reduced power from the optional engine by 5 bhp (3.7 kW), and its noise levels were lowered. H.E.I. ignition was introduced on 1975 engines.

Serious problems with the engine led to a redesign for 1976–1977. Marketed as the Dura-Built 140, the new engine had improved coolant pathways, redesigned cylinder head with quieter hydraulic valve lifters, longer-life valve stem seals that reduced oil consumption by 50%, and redesigned water pump, head gasket, and thermostat. Warranty was upgraded to five years or 60,000 miles (97,000 km). In 1977 a pulse-air system was added to meet stricter 1977 U.S. exhaust emission regulations and the engine paint color (used on all Chevrolet engines) changed from orange to blue.

In August 1975, Chevrolet conducted an endurance test of three Vegas powered by Dura-Built engines, advertised as a 60,000 miles in 60 days Durability Run. Supervised by the United States Auto Club, three pre-production 1976 hatchback coupes with manual transmissions and air conditioning were driven non-stop for 60,000 miles (97,000 km) in 60 days through the deserts of California and Nevada by nine drivers, covering a total of 180,000 miles (290,000 km). With the sole failure a broken timing belt, Vega project engineer Bernie Ernest said GM felt “very comfortable with the warranty."

Motor Trend said "Chevrolet chose the 349-mile Southwestern desert route in order to show the severely criticized engine and cooling system had been improved in the 1976 model." In ambient temperatures between 99 °F (37 °C) and 122 °F (50 °C) the cars lost 24 US fluid ounces (0.71 L) of coolant (normal evaporation under the conditions) during the 180,000 miles. They averaged 28.9 mpg-US (8.1 L/100 km; 34.7 mpg-imp) and used one quart of oil per 3,400 miles. Driving expenses averaged 2.17 cents per mile. One of the cars went on display at the 1976 New York Auto Show. The 1976 Vega was marketed as a durable and reliable car.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_kammback_wagon_3.jpg (325.9 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpeg chevrolet_vega_nochback_sedan_1.jpeg (200.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpeg chevrolet_vega_nochback_sedan_2.jpeg (144.3 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_panel_express_1.jpg (543.8 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_panel_express_2.jpg (617.2 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_vega_panel_express_3.jpg (559.6 KB, 3 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:42 AM
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Assembly

GM built the $75 million Lordstown Assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio near Youngstown to make the Vega. It was the world's most automated auto plant, where approximately 95 percent of each Vega body's 3,900 welds were carried out automatically by Unimate industrial robots. Engine and rear axle assemblies positioned by hydraulic lifts with bodies overhead moved along the line at 30 feet (9.1 m) per minute. Sub-assembly areas, conveyor belts and quality control were all computer directed.

Production Speed

Production at Lordstown was projected at 100 Vegas an hour—one every 36 seconds—from the outset. Twice the normal volume, this was the fastest rate in the world. Within months Lordstown produced 73.5 Vegas an hour.

Lordstown workers had 36 seconds to perform their tasks instead of the customary minute. With 25 percent more line workers than needed, they formed groups in which three worked while a fourth rested. Although there were mechanical flaws, the quality of early Vega assembly, e.g. fit and finish, was acceptable. The car earned Motor Trend's 1971 Car of the Year award. In October 1971, General Motors handed management of Lordstown from Chevrolet and Fisher Body to General Motors Assembly Division (GMAD). GMAD imposed more rigorous discipline and cut costs by dropping the fourth "extra" worker. The United Auto Workers (UAW) said 800 workers were laid off at Lordstown in the first year under GMAD; GMAD said 370. Management accused workers of slowing the line and sabotaging cars by omitting parts and doing shoddy work. Workers said GMAD sped up the line and cut staffing. Quality suffered. In March 1972, the 7,700 workers called a wildcat strike that lasted a month and cost GM $150 million. Vega production rose by over 100,000 units for 1972, and would have been stronger but for the strike. 1975 was a "rolling model change" at 100 cars per hour with no downtime.

As production approached 100 vehicles per hour problems arose in the paint shop. At 85 units per hour, nearly all required repair. Conventional pressures and tips could not apply the paint fast enough; increasing pressures and tip apertures produced runs and sags. Fisher Body and lacquer paint supplier DuPont, over one weekend, developed new paint chemistry and application specifics: Non-Aqueous Dispersion Lacquer (NAD). The new formulation raised paint shop throughput to 106 units per hour.

Vertical Rail Transport

Although Lordstown Assembly had a purpose-built exit off of the Ohio Turnpike built to make shipment easier, the Vega was designed for vertical shipment, nose down. General Motors and Southern Pacific designed "Vert-A-Pac" rail cars to hold 30 Vegas each, compared with conventional tri-level autoracks which held 18. The Vega was fitted with four removable cast-steel sockets on the underside and had plastic spacers—removed at unloading—to protect engine and transmission mounts. The rail car ramp/doors were opened and closed via forklift.

Vibration and low-speed crash tests ensured the cars would not shift or suffer damage in transit. The Vega was delivered topped with fluids, ready to drive to dealerships, so the engine was baffled to prevent oil entering the number one cylinder; the battery filler caps high on the rear edge of the casing prevented acid spills; a tube drained fuel from carburetor to vapor canister; and the windshield washer bottle stood at 45 degrees.

Production figures

Total Vega production, mainly from Lordstown, was 2,006,661 including 3,508 Cosworth models. Production peaked at 2,400 units per day. In 1973–1974, Vegas were also built at GM of Canada's Sainte-Thérèse Assembly plant in Quebec.

Source: wikipedia.org
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg chevrolet_vega_panel_van_express_1.jpeg (1.78 MB, 3 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:47 AM
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The Cosworth Vega (1975-1976)

The Chevrolet Cosworth Vega is a subcompact four-passenger automobile produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors for the 1975 and 1976 model years. It is a limited-production version of the Vega, with higher performance.

Chevrolet developed the car's all-aluminum inline-four 122 cu in (1,999 cc) engine, and British company Cosworth Engineering designed the DOHC cylinder head. 5,000 engines were built.

3,508 cars were made. They were priced $900 below the 1975 Chevrolet Corvette.

Racing Origin

Known at Cosworth Engineering as Project EA, a Cosworth racing engine based on the Vega aluminum block produced a reported 260 hp (190 kW) and powered Chevron and Lola race cars to wins in the 2-liter class in their first outings. The ZO9 Cosworth Vega engine is a de-tuned version. Bore, stroke and valve sizes are identical but it lacks the EA engine’s dry sump lubricating system (unnecessary in a street use car), has a lower compression ratio and different valve timing, and uses Bendix electronic fuel injection instead of Lucas mechanical injection to cope with a wider range of operating conditions as well as emission controls.

Development

In March, 1970 John DeLorean, GM’s general manager and vice-president, sent engine designer Calvin Wade to England in search of cylinder head technology to improve the Vega's performance. Fuel injection would be needed to control emissions without power loss; also stronger internal parts to work with the existing block and the Cosworth head. That summer, DeLorean authorized Wade to build a prototype Cosworth Vega engine. A meager budget, and resistance from managers between Wade and DeLorean, meant low priority for the project, but once approved by DeLorean it could not be killed.

In June, 1971 the prototype gave 170 hp (130 kW) on dual Holley-Weber two-barrel carburetors. At Easter, 1972 GM President Edward Cole drove three Vegas for comparison: a base model, an all-aluminum small-block V8-powered prototype, and the Cosworth. He pledged approval from the Engineering Policy Group for DeLorean's request to initiate Cosworth production. Approval of development aimed at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certification soon followed, and Wade began a 12-car development program to accumulate test mileage in a range of environments including high altitude, heat and cold, to test the engine’s eligibility. At the GM desert proving ground, the car reached 122 mph (196 km/h).

In April, 1973 the design was frozen and two cars were built to accumulate mileage for EPA emission certification. The press was notified of the program and in August 1973 a Car and Driver feature alerted the public to an upcoming 140 hp (100 kW) Cosworth Vega. The engine needed more dynamometer time, new cam profiles to trade some high-end power for more low-end torque, and a tubular header to replace the cast iron exhaust manifold. Although delayed, the project now received higher priority, more engineering manpower and more funding. Chevrolet dealers began accepting large deposits for early delivery.

The design was frozen again in January, 1974. A stainless steel header was specified, to increase power between 2,000 rpm up and the 7,000 rpm redline. Camshaft lift and duration were eased back and the torque curve reshaped to a street-oriented peak of 5,200 rpm. Project coordinator William Large built two cars for durability testing. By April 1974, the engines ran “clean” for 40,000 miles (64,000 km), after which hydrocarbon curves on the first car rose far in excess of the permitted 3 grams per mile (1.9 g/km), owing to burned exhaust valves. For certification, five months’ durability miles would have to be reaccumulated.

Development resumed, to improve emissions durability and ready the engine for more stringent 1975 standards. The fuel injection was redesigned for better air distribution. High-energy electronic ignition and mandatory catalytic converter were added; also a Pulse Air system, functionally the same as an air pump but without the pump's six-horsepower loss. A larger catalytic converter further guarded against power loss. More advanced ignition timing, and the lead-free fuel required with the converter, prevented exhaust-valve failure.


Chevrolet require all engines to survive 200 hours at full load. The Cosworth lasted over 500 hours. For a clutch burst test, Cale Wade revved the engine to 9,400 rpm under its own power without damage to clutch or engine. Three cars, in three different configurations, resumed mileage accumulation in September 1974.

By January, 1975 the mileage was completed with no failures. One configuration stayed within 1975 California limits, making the Cosworth Vega the only GM car certified for all 50 states. On March 14, 1975 the EPA emissions certificate was issued, allowing sale of 1975 models. Production began immediately to fill the order backlog. 30 engines per day were hand-built — two- and three-worker teams to each engine — in the Tonawanda, New York engine plant's "clean room", originally devised for the ZL-1 all-aluminum 427 cu in (6,997 cc) V8. At the Vega's Lordstown assembly plant, Cosworth production was 1.6 cars per hour. Cosworth Vega 0001, the original Chicago Auto Show vehicle, with a clear Plexiglas hood, is in the GM Heritage Collection.

Overview and changes

All 2,061 1975 Cosworth Vegas were finished in black acrylic lacquer with gold "Cosworth Twin Cam" lettering on the front fenders and rear cove panel and gold pinstriping on hood bulge, body sides, wheel openings, and rear cove. (Black was unavailable on other Vegas until mid-1976.) Most have black interiors. The custom interior with perforated vinyl seat trim (RPO ZJ1) was standard, with black cloth seat inserts a $50 option. About 16 percent had white vinyl interiors. All Cosworths had a gold-colored engine-turned dash bezel, gold-plated dash plaque with build sequence number, 8,000 rpm tachometer, and Cosworth Twin-Cam Vega steering wheel emblem.

'Torque arm' rear suspension is like that of the Monza 2+2, and the axle, from the Monza 2+2, gives a 3.73:1 ratio from a 7.5-inch (190 mm) ring gear. A limited slip differential was optional. Included were GT springs, shocks, and stabilizer bars (larger at the rear than the Vega GT's); exclusive BR70-13 BSW radial tires on British-made 6 inch, gold-painted cast aluminum wheels with Chevy center caps; black-finished wiper arms, H.D. radiator and provisions for “Fast Steer” option. The Cosworth was the first Chevrolet passenger car with electronic fuel injection. Air conditioning, power steering and power brakes were not offered. A pilot line 1976 model was built in September 1975, and volume 1976 production began in December 1975.

A 1976 facelift included wider grill, tri-color tail lamps and extensive body anti-rust improvements. A new Borg-Warner five-speed manual overdrive transmission with 4.10 axle was optional. The exhaust system had a single tailpipe instead of 1975’s dual outlets. Seat trim changed to grained vinyl, and the optional extra-charge cloth trim seat inserts were changed to a "houndstooth" type named sport-cloth. In January, a "Sky-Roof" with tinted reflectorized sliding glass and 8-track tape player options were introduced. In February, eight 1976 Vega exterior colors were added: Antique White, Dark Blue Metallic, Firethorn Metallic, Mahogany Metallic, Dark Green Metallic, Buckskin, Medium Saddle Metallic, and Medium Orange; plus two additional interior colors, Firethorn and Buckskin. 1,447 1976 models were built. In November 1975, it had been decided to discontinue the car after the 1976 model year. Total production of 3,508 cars ended in July 1976 with a Medium Saddle Metallic model delivered to a Cleveland, Ohio dealer. 190,321 Vega hatchback coupes were produced in the same period.

Engine

The Cosworth Vega Twin-Cam engine is a 122 cu in (1,999 cc) inline-four with die-cast aluminum alloy cylinder block and Type 356 aluminum alloy, 16-valve cylinder head with double overhead camshafts (DOHC) held in a removable cam-carrier that doubles as a guide for the valve lifters. Each camshaft has five bearings and is turned by individual cam gears on the front end. The camshafts, water pump and fan are driven by a fiberglass cord-reinforced neoprene rubber belt, much like the Vega 140 cu in (2,294 cc) engine. The cylinder head has sintered iron valve seats and iron cast valve seats. Race-bred forged aluminum pistons with heat-treated forged steel crankshaft and connecting rods enhance durability.

The engine has a stainless steel exhaust header and Bendix electronic fuel injection (EFI), with four injector valves, an electronic control unit (ECU), five independent sensors and two fuel pumps. Some 60 lb (27 kg) lighter than the SOHC Vega engine, it develops maximum power at 5,600 rpm and is redlined at 6,500 rpm, whereas the SOHC Vega engine peaks at 4,400 rpm and runs to 5,000 rpm. Final ratings are 110 hp (82 kW) at 5,600 rpm, 107 lb·ft (145 N·m) of torque at 4,800 rpm. 3,508 of the 5,000 engines were used. GM disassembled about 500 and scrapped the remainder.

Source: wikipedia.org
Attached Images
File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_1.jpg (824.7 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_2.jpg (931.3 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_3.jpg (829.8 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_4.jpg (834.4 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_5.jpg (820.4 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_6.jpg (953.2 KB, 1 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:50 AM
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Cosworth Vega #7
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File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_8.jpg (283.5 KB, 0 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:53 AM
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Cosworth Vega #8
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File Type: jpg chevrolet_cosworth_vega_14.jpg (390.4 KB, 3 views)
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:54 AM
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Cosworth Vega #9
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  #10  
Old 10-13-2014, 06:42 AM
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"They don't make them like they used to!"

... Thank God.
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  #11  
Old 10-13-2014, 03:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitdy View Post
"They don't make them like they used to!"

... Thank God.
... but they could be "Vert-a-Pac"ed into railcars!
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Old 10-13-2014, 04:26 PM
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I find the Cosworth Vega strangely interesting.

Is that bad?
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Old 10-13-2014, 06:13 PM
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This is a safe place, but yes, that is bad, and it makes you a bad person.
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  #14  
Old 10-16-2014, 11:18 AM
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Oh dear.

Anyway.

I'm off to post old Chryslers.
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